English

Admission Requirements
Program for the M. A. Degree
Program for the Ph.D. Degree
Courses of Instruction

Available on the Master of Arts and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees.
For admission and general requirements, see the front of this Bulletin. Specific departmental requirements and supplementary information are given here. For details about the program, see our website (www.eng.tcu.edu).

Admission Requirements:
B.A. degree or equivalent, with credit in English equivalent to the TCU 30-semester-hour major and with sophomore-level credit in a foreign language. Applicants with less preparation may be admitted conditionally, but must take such additional courses as are prescribed by Addran College and the Departmental Director of Graduate Studies. Applicants must present recent Graduate Record Examination scores with the application for admission. Applicants must also submit a writing sample (10-20 pages, exclusive of notes and works cited) that demonstrates appropriate academic and writing skills needed for success in a graduate program in English. Applicants should include with their materials a personal statement outlining career goals, explaining how they match the Program in English at TCU, and three to five references directly relevant to postgraduate work in English studies.

Program for the M. A. Degree
At least 30 semester hours of credit approved by the Director of Graduate Studies in addition to any course work required because of inadequate prerequisites. The 30 hours will include 6 hours for a thesis and may include up to 9 hours for an approved minor or approved courses in a related field or fields.

Program for the Ph.D. Degree 1. The Course Requirements
Completion for credit of a minimum of 54 semester hours of graduate courses, exclusive of credit hours for the dissertation. Postgraduate hours completed more than seven years prior to a student's admission into TCU's English graduate program may not count toward requirements; the graduate advisor will determine applicable credit on a case by case basis. Of the 54 hours, at least 30 must be taken at TCU, and 27 must be in courses that satisfy the graduate core, which is described in subdivisions A, B, and C below:

A. Resources for English Studies (6 sem. hrs.)
   3 sem. hrs. - The Profession of English
   3 sem. hrs. - Introduction to Modern Critical Theory

B. Rhetoric and Composition (6 sem. hrs.)
   3 sem. hrs. - Theories of Composition
   3 sem. hrs. - History of Rhetoric or Modern Rhetoric

C. Literature (15 sem. hrs.)
   6 or 9 sem. hrs. in literature before 1800
   6 or 9 sem. hrs. in literature after 1800

D. Focus (9 sem. hrs.)

A minimum of 9 semester hours is required in the student's area of concentration, which is to be chosen from the following:
   1. British Literature
   2. American Literature
   3. Rhetoric and Composition

2. The Language Requirement
Reading knowledge of one approved foreign language, typically selected from French, German, Spanish or Latin, is required. Other languages may be offered on approval of the Departmental Graduate Committee, but the language should be the one most appropriate to the student's research, field of concentration or professional development. This requirement may be met by satisfying the general University statement under "Ph.D. Degree Requirements" or by any other means approved by the Departmental Graduate Committee. The language requirement must be satisfied before the student can be admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree.

3. Examinations
A qualifying examination, consisting of three essays written over a period of five days and a two-hour oral examination, is offered when a student has completed for credit 48-54 hours of graduate courses, of which 24-30 hours must be from TCU; has completed the graduate core; and has met the language and residency requirements. These examinations are based upon the student's areas of concentration. Two examinations must fall within the concentration area; the third may fall within a related or directly complementary field. The student and his or her advisory committee will determine the areas to be covered by these specialty examinations. A student who fails one or more parts of the examinations may take them again, but a second failure on one examination bars the student from candidacy.

4. The Dissertation

Doctoral students must complete a dissertation that demonstrates their ability to do independent and original research and to synthesize their findings and existing knowledge into a unified document. A candidate must present a dissertation prospectus to his or her advisory committee for discussion, suggestions and approval before proceeding with the project. The candidate's oral defense of the dissertation is a public lecture based upon his or her findings, presented to the English Department Graduate Faculty, Graduate Students, and other interested persons within the academic community.
Advisory Committee: Before taking qualifying examinations, a student requests through the Director of Graduate Studies that the Associate Dean of AddRan College of Arts and Sciences appoint an advisory committee of at least four members. The dissertation director normally serves as chair of the student's advisory committee. One member of the committee may come from outside the English Department if the candidate's dissertation project requires such additional expertise. The advisory committee suggests concentration courses, prepares the qualifying examinations, approves the student for candidacy and directs the dissertation.

Academic Advising:
Students will be advised by the Departmental Director of Graduate Studies throughout their doctoral programs.
The following is a complete list of courses offered by this department. Go to Class Search to see which courses are being taught this semester.

Courses of Instruction:
The content of graduate courses varies from semester to semester. For detailed course descriptions specifying topics, figures, and areas of coverage included in recent offerings, visit the Department's website, where detailed course descriptions, listing both readings and requirements, are posted each term.

Resources for Literary Study


60103 BIBLIOGRAPHY AND METHODS OF RESEARCH.
History, materials and techniques of manuscript and book production; bibliographical description; use of libraries and bibliographical tools; introduction to textual analysis; thesis and dissertation problems and procedures.

60113 THE PROFESSION OF ENGLISH.
An introduction to the practical and theoretical issues of the profession for all first semester graduate students. Topics included concern the history of the university and departments of English, pedagogical ethics, the necessity and methods of research, and the mechanics of scholarly publication in the humanities.

60123 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN CRITICAL THEORY.
A seminar on major authors and issues in contemporary critical theory.

80123 SEMINAR IN LITERARY THEORY.
A seminar in the theoretical problematics of literary language and in current trends within critical theory. Topics change each term; may be repeated for credit.

Writing Workshops


50243 TEACHING WRITING.
A course for teachers of English combining theories of composition with practical pedagogy and classroom strategies for the teaching of writing.

60203 WRITING FOR THE PROFESSIONS.
A workshop for the student who wishes to learn how to write in a specific academic discipline or in a profession.

Studies in Language

60303 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE.
A study beginning with a reading knowledge of Old English and following the development of the language through Early Modern English.

60313 INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH LINGUISTICS.
An introduction to the phonology, morphology and syntax of Modern English. Some attention to language acquisition, dialects and language change. Prerequisite: 60303 or permission of instructor.

Studies in British Literature

60403 BEOWULF.
A close reading of the epic in Old English with some attention to modern criticism of the poem. Prerequisite: English 60303 or a course in Old English.

60413 CHAUCER.
Chaucer's language and poems with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales as a work of art and as a reflection of the age.

60423 PROSE AND POETRY OF THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE.
The prose writers and poets of 16th and 17th century England in relation to the cultural circumstances influencing and being influenced by their works. Topics may include the prospect and enactment of censorship; the centrality of the patronage system; courts and courtiers; changing views of monarchy and obedience; religious controversy; issues of gender, ethnicity and class; literature and science; pseudo-nonfictional strategies; adaptations of the bible, history, and mythology; and early book production and circulation.

60433 RENAISSANCE DRAMA EXCLUSIVE OF SHAKESPEARE.
The study of the works of major Elizabethan and Jacobean playwrights.

60443 SEVENTEENTH CENTURY POETRY.
Study of the works of major seventeenth century poets including Donne and Marvell.

60453 THE AGE OF DRYDEN AND POPE.
English literature from 1688 to 1745 with emphasis on Dryden, Swift and Pope, exclusive of the drama.

60463 THE AGE OF JOHNSON.
English literature from 1745-1800, with emphasis on Johnson, Boswell, Burns and other major writers exclusive of the drama.

60473 BRITISH NOVEL I
(to 1832). Major fiction to the early nineteenth century.

70403 BRITISH NOVEL II
(since 1832). Major fiction from the early nineteenth to the early twentieth century.

70413 ROMANTIC POETRY AND PROSE.
The study of works by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats and others.

70423 VICTORIAN POETRY AND PROSE.
The study of major works and authors, including Arnold, Browning and Tennyson.

70433 MODERN BRITISH NOVEL.
The study of major fiction of the twentieth century.

70443 MODERN BRITISH POETRY.
Study of twentieth century British poets.

70453 MODERN BRITISH DRAMA.
The study of important plays and playwrights of the twentieth century.

70463 MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE.
Survey of major trends and writers in British literature since 1900.

70473 TWENTIETH CENTURY IRISH WRITERS.
Study of important Irish works, with emphasis on Yeats, Joyce and Synge.

70483 VICTORIAN WOMEN WRITERS.
An intensive examination of Victorian women poets, novelists, and prose writers in the context of historical conditions and feminist theory.

70493 NINETEENTH CENTURY STUDIES IN BRITISH LITERATURE.
Selected topics in nineteenth-century British literature (variable emphasis each semester). Past offerings have included the Medieval Revival and Nineteenth-Century Literature and Rhetoric.

80403 SEMINAR IN SPENSER.


80413 SEMINAR IN SHAKESPEARE.


80423 SEMINAR IN MILTON.


80433 SEMINAR IN BRITISH LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.


80443 SEMINAR IN BRITISH LITERATURE OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD.
Variable emphasis each semester.

80453 SEMINAR IN BRITISH LITERATURE OF THE VICTORIAN PERIOD.
Variable emphasis each semester. (Past offerings have included The Brownings' Circle.)

80463 SEMINAR IN MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE.


80473 SEMINAR IN RENAISSANCE LITERATURE AND THE "NEW" SCIENCE.
This course examines how and why artists and scientists in the century c. 1550-1650 interacted intellectually as they did. Topics include the rhetoric of medieval and Renaissance scientific discourse, influences of scientific developments and discoveries upon European (chiefly British) letters; strategies used by "literary" artists to appropriate, revise, or contest scientific developments in astronomy, medicine, philosophy and other disciplines; and relationships between scientific and literary discourses of social transformation.

Studies in American Literature


60503 EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE.
American literature from first settlement through 1800, including the Puritan writers (Winthrop, Mather, etc.), the shapers of the American Republic (Paine, Jefferson, Franklin, the Federalist writers, etc.), and early writers of the New Nation (Brown, Dwight, Freneau, Rowson, etc.).

70503 AMERICAN NOVEL I.
The American novel from its beginnings to 1890. Topics examined include the Gothic and sentimental novelists (Brown, Rowson), the early national novel (Cooper), the Romantics (Hawthorne, Melville), Realism and the Realists (Twain, James, Howells), and the early Naturalists (Norris).

70513 AMERICAN NOVEL II.
The development of the American novel from 1890 to the start of World War II.

70523 AMERICAN NOVEL III.
The development of the American novel from 1940 to the present.

70533 THE AMERICAN SHORT STORY.
A study of short fiction in American literature.

70543 AMERICAN POETRY I.
The development of American poetry from the beginnings to 1900.

70553 AMERICAN POETRY II.
Major poets and works of the twentieth century.

70563 AMERICAN DRAMA.
Major playwrights and plays in American literature.

70573 AMERICAN NON-FICTION PROSE.
Major documents of non-fiction prose in American literature.

80503 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN LITERATURE BEFORE 1900.
Topics vary; recent offerings have included "Emerson and His Circle" and "The American Renaissance."

80513 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1900.


80583 SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE.
This seminar provides graduate students with the opportunity to research and present theoretical approaches to representative contemporary fiction by African-Americans. Continuities will be established between theories shaped by the Black Arts Movement of the sixties and those shaped by post-modernist thinking. Representative writers may include Alice Walker, Toni Cade Bambara, Charles Johnson, Toni Morrison and Ernest Gaines.

Studies in Comparative Literature


50603 CLASSICAL DRAMA.
The study of plays surviving from ancient Greece and Rome.

Studies in Rhetoric and Composition

60703 INTRODUCTION TO COMPOSITION STUDIES.
A survey of the major contemporary theoretical statements about composing and the teaching of composition.

60713 MODERN RHETORIC.
Major theories of rhetoric and important rhetoricians of the twentieth century.

70703 HISTORY OF RHETORIC.
A study of the major authors and issues in the history of rhetoric from antiquity to the present day.

70713 RHETORIC AND LITERATURE.
The applications and implications of rhetorical criticism for the study of literature.

70723 RHETORIC AND CRITICISM.
A study of classical and modern rhetorical theory, with emphasis on the uses of rhetoric in the study of modern communication.

80703 SEMINAR IN RHETORIC.
A study of selected major figures and issues in the history of rhetoric.

Directed Studies


50970 DIRECTED STUDIES IN ENGLISH.


70980 THESIS.


70990 THESIS.


90980 DISSERTATION.


90990 DISSERTATION. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy.