History

Program for the M.A. Degree
Program for the Ph.D. Degree
Courses of Instruction

Available on the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees.

Prerequisites:
The B.A. degree or its equivalent with a 24-semester-hour major in history, and sophomore-level credit in a foreign language. Applicants lacking these qualifications may be admitted conditionally, but must take such preparatory work as may be prescribed by the Chair of the Department of History. Applicants should take the Graduate Record Examinations and submit these scores with their admission materials. (The History Department Graduate Committee considers applications during the fall and spring semesters. Yet for maximum consideration applicants should submit their materials before February 1. Late applications will be accepted but will not have priority of consideration.)

Program for the M.A. Degree


A minimum of 30 approved semester hours, including at least 15 in history courses and 6 in thesis. A maximum of 9 hours of supporting work in related disciplines is optional. History 50063 (Bibliography and Historical Methods) is required of all graduate students. For specific requirements, consult the History Department Guide to Graduate Study.

Program for the Ph.D. Degree


For admission to the doctoral program, the student must present a strong academic record and provide evidence of an ability to do scholarly research and writing. Even though he or she may have earned an M.A. degree at TCU, the student must reapply to AddRan College before being admitted to work toward the Ph.D. degree. Letters of recommendation, Graduate Record Examinations scores, a statement of purpose and writing sample, and three letters of recommendation are required.

The doctorate is offered in the areas of the United States and Latin America history. Students will normally be expected to earn the M.A. degree before continuing toward the Ph.D.
Degree requirements are: 1. A suitable number and variety of graduate courses to prepare the student for the qualifying examination and for the writing of the dissertation. In addition to the major area of specialization, the student also will complete course work in two minor areas, usually 9 hours in each. With the approval of the student's graduate committee, as many as 12 hours may be taken outside the department. The doctoral program will comprise no fewer than 54 hours of graduate courses for credit exclusive of credit-hours for the dissertation.

2. Reading knowledge of one approved foreign language, usually selected from French, German, or Spanish. The language should be the one most appropriate to the student's research and fields of concentration. Reading knowledge can be demonstrated either by superior performance on the ETS examination, by satisfactory completion of a special course offered by the Modern Languages Department, by independent study and successful examination by a member of the department fluent in the language, or by achieving at least a grade of "B" in six hours of sophomore level college language courses. The language requirements must be met no later than the end of the first semester of the second year.

3. A comprehensive qualifying examination consisting of: a written exam covering one of the two minor areas, a written and oral exam covering the major area of specialization. The student must pass the written minor field and major field exams before taking the oral exam. On both the written and the oral he or she will be allowed only two opportunities. Upon the completion of the comprehensive qualifying examination, the student is admitted to candidacy. For specifics regarding this examination, see the History Department Guide to Graduate Study.

4. A doctoral dissertation constituting an original contribution to scholarship or a new synthesis of existing knowledge. The candidate will defend the dissertation in a final oral examination.
The following is a complete list of courses offered by this department. Go to Class Search to see which courses are being taught this semester.

Courses of Instruction

50063 HISTORICAL METHODS.
Techniques of historical research and documentation. Evaluation of documents, applying internal and external criticism to determine validity of use. Oral history research evaluation and interviewing techniques.

50070 HISTORY, ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ARCHIVES I and II.
The historical development of archival institutions, procedures and techniques with special emphasis on American federal, state and local records, both public and private. Students will be introduced to professional field work in the archives of the participating institutions.

50080 ARCHIVAL INTERNSHIP, I and II.
Supervised professional training at the Federal Archives and Records Center of Fort Worth, the Regional State Archives of Texas, the Amon Carter Library and the Manuscript Collection of Texas Christian University. Open only to students who are taking or have completed History 50070. Required of all students who select the Archives Studies option.

50933 PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY.
(See PHIL 50933) Prerequisites: six hours of history, three hours of philosophy. A philosophical analysis of historiography: the logical, conceptual and epistemological characterization of what historians do; also includes a study of traditional attempts to discover some meaning which transcends the intelligibility sought and achieved by ordinary historical work.

50943 STUDIES IN ETHNO-HISTORY.
The use of ethnological data and historical documents for the cultural history of literate and non-literate peoples.

50960 HISTORIOGRAPHY AND BIBLIOGRAPHY.
The major historians of the past, changes in the interpretation and philosophies of history and the major bibliographic sources utilized in the writing of history.

50970 SPECIAL STUDIES IN HISTORY


50980 HISTORICAL WRITING AND EDITING.
Acquaints the student with the methods and problems of research and historical writing. Also covers the principles and methods of editing historical journals and documents, including archival manuscripts.
60003 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF WAR. Traces the causes, course, and effects of wars in the Western world from ancient times to the present. Emphasis is placed on the principal wars, key battles, and technological innovations. Topics may vary to concentrate on one period.

60013 GRADUATE READINGS IN WOMEN IN THE WESTERN WORLD SINCE 1500.
Readings in women's experiences in the West since 1500. Topics will cover issues such as changes involving gender and family, work, sexuality, and politics.

60023 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE WOMEN'S MOVEMENT IN ENGLAND AND AMERICA, 1792-
1972.
Beginning with Mary Wollstonecraft's writings and progressing to the "new feminism" of the 1960s, this course looks at the political ideas of the women's suffrage movement on both sides of the Atlantic and notes the similarities and differences. The readings examine the earliest forms of political agitation by women, militancy, the alliance with the left, and the pragmatic feminism emerging in the 1970s.

60103 GRADUATE READINGS IN ANCIENT GREECE.
Study of ancient Greece, including the Bronze Age, Classical, and Hellenistic periods, with emphasis on ancient sources and modern historiographical issues.

60113 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE ROMAN REPUBLIC AND EMPIRE.
Study in ancient Rome, including the Etruscan period, the Republic, and the Empire through the fifth century, with emphasis on the ancient sources and modern historiography issues.

60203 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE RENAISSANCE.
The political, social, economic and cultural development of Europe, concentrating on the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Topics include the Black Death; the crises of the fourteenth century; Renaissance Florence and Venice; the Renaissance in northern Europe.

60213 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE REFORMATION.
Focuses on Europe in the sixteenth century. Topics will include the Protestant and Catholic reformations as theological, social, economic and political events; popular culture; witchcraft; the impact of overseas expansion.

60223 GRADUATE READINGS IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY EUROPE.
The crisis of the seventeenth century-fiction or reality? Course focuses on issues raised by the great historiographical debate about the existence, nature and extent of crisis in the seventeenth century.

60233 GRADUATE READINGS IN ENLIGHTENMENT EUROPE.
European thought and society in pre-revolutionary Europe. Topics will include the demographic revolution, industrialization, empire and its impact, the writing and reception of Enlightenment ideas at all levels.

60243 GRADUATE READINGS IN SPAIN AND PORTUGAL.
Use of primary and secondary sources to examine the cultural, political, religious, and diplomatic evolution of Iberian institutions.

60303 GRADUATE READINGS IN EUROPE, 1815-1870.
Traces the major political, diplomatic, military, and social developments of the period. Principal topics include the impact of the French Revolution and Napoleon, the rise of nationalism and romanticism, the revolutions of 1830 and 1848; the Second Empire of France, and the unification of Italy and Germany.

60313 GRADUATE READINGS IN EUROPE, 1870-1918.
Traces the major political, diplomatic, military, and social developments of the period. Principal topics include developments within the major European states, the rise of alliance systems, the arms race, imperialism, immediate causes of the First World War, and the war itself and its impact on Europe and the world.

60323 GRADUATE READINGS IN EUROPE, 1918-1945.
Traces the major political, diplomatic, military, and social developments of the period. Principal topics include the impact of the First World War, the peace settlements following the war, the rise of totalitarianism and the failure of European democracy in many states, the drift toward war including the civil war in Spain and invasion of Ethiopia, and the Second World War itself.

60333 GRADUATE READINGS IN EUROPE, 1945-1991.
Traces the major political, diplomatic, military, and social developments of the period. Principal topics include the diplomacy of the Second World War, the impact of the war on Europe, the causes of post-war tensions between East and West, the division of Germany, developments within the states of Europe, the end of European colonialism, the Common Market, the course of the Cold War, and European relations with the U.S. and U.S.S.R.

60343 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON.
Begins with an overview of French history, then examines the background and causes of the French Revolution: political, intellectual, social, and economic. Traces events leading to the liberal monarchy, its replacement with a radical republic, and the rise to power of Napoleon Bonaparte. Discusses Napoleonic France and Europe and the wars of the French Revolution and Napoleonic period, ending with the Hundred Days in 1815.

60353 GRADUATE READINGS IN MODERN FRANCE, 1815 TO THE PRESENT.
Traces the domestic history of France in the period, beginning with the impact of the French Revolution and Napoleon. Traces the political, diplomatic, military, and social developments of the period. Also discusses France's role as a colonial power and the impact on France of two world wars as well as the Indo-China and Algerian Wars. Ends with recent developments in the Fifth Republic.

60363 GRADUATE READINGS IN MODERN GERMANY, 1815 TO THE PRESENT.
Traces the major political, diplomatic, military, economic, and social events in Germany in the period. Topics include the impact of the French Revolution and Napoleon, the rise of nationalism, the social impact of industrialization, political unification under Bismarck, the two world wars and their effects on Germany, the division of Germany following World War II and its reunification. Includes recent developments in the Federal Republic.

60373 GRADUATE READINGS IN EUROPEAN THOUGHT AND CULTURE, 1800 TO THE PRESENT.
Traces European thought and culture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include nationalism, industrialism, romanticism, naturalism, socialism, the search for place, and the rise of fascism. Includes key developments in literature and the arts.

60403 GRADUATE READINGS IN CENTRAL EUROPE, 1700 TO THE PRESENT.
Traces events in Central Europe from the general European revolutions of 1848 through the collapse of communism. Includes a discussion of the causes, course, and effects of the two 20th century world wars. Includes an overview of recent developments.

60413 GRADUATE READINGS IN RUSSIA TO 1861.
The evolution of the early Russian state and its development under the grand princes and czars to the emancipation of the serfs and the beginning of the "great reform."

60423 GRADUATE READINGS IN RUSSIA, 1861 TO THE PRESENT.
The forces and personalities that molded modern Russia after the emancipation of the serfs, the revolutionary movements and their leaders, and the economic and political factors that brought the downfall of the czarist regime.

60433 GRADUATE READINGS IN CHINA AND JAPAN TO 1800.
The underlying foundations of Chinese and Japanese culture, emphasizing especially the values, religions, and personalities as well as the political, military, and social institutions.

60443 GRADUATE READINGS IN CHINA AND JAPAN, 1800 TO THE PRESENT.
The major events and personalities influencing the development of China and Japan and the impact of the West upon the region.

60513 GRADUATE READINGS IN TUDOR-STUART ENGLAND, 1485-1714.
This course provides a careful consideration of the nature of "modern" England. The readings will analyze the monarchy and parliament built up by the Tudor Monarchs and the crises of the Stuart period: the Puritan Revolution, Restoration and the Glorious Revolution. There will be special emphasis upon the clash of ideas, religious, social and political.

60523 GRADUATE READINGS IN ENGLAND AND GREAT BRITAIN, 1603 TO THE PRESENT.
Selected readings in such themes in the history of modern Britain as constitutional evolution, technological and economic change, empire and great power status, and the creation of the welfare state.

60533 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF GREAT BRITAIN, 1815-1901.
These readings focus upon the transformation of British society from traditional social classes and means of work through the Industrial Revolution. Political reform pointed the way toward social and economic reform found primarily in the next century. Graduate students will investigate myths of "Victorian" ideals and religious thought and how emerging socialism challenged the cultural norms.

60543 GRADUATE READINGS IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN
. This course analyzes the two World Wars and their impact upon British society, the triumph of socialism in the Labour Party and its decline towards the end of the century. Britain's political culture as it changed from a dominant world power to a second rank nation despite its Commonwealth and its membership in the European community are carefully documented.

60553 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE BRITISH EMPIRE, 1603-1857.
Selected readings in the establishment and governance of the first British colonial presence in Ireland and North America, the evolution of colonies of settlement and colonies of color, formal and informal connections between the metropole and its colonies.

60563 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE BRITISH EMPIRE AND COMMONWEALTH, 1857-1975.
Selected readings in the "new imperialism" of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, World War I and the empire, nationalism and the "end of empire" after 1945.

60603 GRADUATE READINGS IN COLONIAL AMERICA FROM THE AGE OF EUROPEAN DISCOVERY TO 1763.
Readings from the Age of European Discovery of America through the Great War for Empire of 1754-1763. The course will examine political, economic, religious, and social and intellectual changes.

60613 GRADUATE READINGS IN REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA, 1763-89.
Readings from the end of the Great War for Empire through the establishment of the United States under the Constitution. The course examines differences between the colonies and Britain, the Revolution, the Confederation period, and the Constitution.

60623 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE AGE OF JEFFERSON, 1789-1828.
Readings from the advent of the Washington administration to the election of 1828. The course examines the differences between Federalists and Republicans, the causes of, the course of the War of 1812, and the Era of Good Feelings.

60633 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE AGE OF JACKSON, 1829-1860.
Traces the rise of Jacksonian Democracy, the Jackson presidency and subsequent administrations to 1860, Manifest Destiny and the westward movement, and sectional tensions leading to the Civil War.

60643 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION, 1861-1876.
Covers the outbreak of the Civil War, the military campaigns of the war, political, social and economic developments of the period, and the postwar reconstruction of the union.

60653 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE PROGRESSIVE PERIOD, 1877-1919.
Readings in the rise of big business, the populist movement and progressive reform in the period from the close of Reconstruction through the Wilson administration.

60663 GRADUATE READINGS IN AMERICA BETWEEN WORLD WARS, 1919-1941.
An examination of the political, economic, and cultural forces of the 1920s and 1930s. Developments in areas such as technology, migration, business and agriculture are included.

60673 GRADUATE READINGS IN UNITED STATES HISTORY, 1941-1975.
The emergence of the United States as a world power and its part in the Cold War. The importance of new technologies, migration and economic development. The rising impact of globalization on the United States.

60703 GRADUATE READINGS IN UNITED STATES FOREIGN RELATIONS FROM INDEPENDENCE TO WORLD WAR I.
Traces the history and historiography of U.S. foreign relations to World War I. Topics include the diplomacy of the American Revolution, the foreign policy of the new republic, the causes and consequences of the War of 1812, national expansion, the era of manifest destiny, Civil War diplomacy, and American imperialism.

60713 GRADUATE READINGS IN UNITED STATES FOREIGN RELATIONS FROM WORLD WAR I TO THE PRESENT.
Traces the history and historiography of U.S. foreign relations from World War I to the present. Topics include the diplomacy of the First World War, the interwar wars, the Second World War, the Cold War, and the post-Cold War era.

60723 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES.
Examines the constitutional history of the United States and constitutional historiography from the colonial period to the present.

60733 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY.
Traces the historical development of the presidency from the Washington administration to the present, with emphasis on selected administrations.

60743 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE AMERICAN WEST.
Traces the history of the Trans-Mississippi West from the Spanish conquest to the present.

60753 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE MODERN SOUTH.
Emphasis on economic development of the South, technology, agriculture, and industry. Examination of political power, the civil rights movement and cultural developments in education, music and literature.

60763 GRADUATE READINGS IN NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY.
Surveys the history of Native Americans from their arrival in America to the present day.

60773 GRADUATE READINGS IN AMERICAN ETHNIC HISTORY.
Surveys the history of various ethnic groups in U.S. history with emphasis on the quest for identity, assimilation, and acculturation.

60783 GRADUATE READINGS IN AMERICAN BUSINESS HISTORY.
Use of primary and secondary sources to examine the evolution of business organizations, the impact of technology on business, the interaction between business and society, and business-government relations.

60793 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH.
A social and cultural approach to the place of medicine and public health in American life, from the colonial era to the present. Emphasis on the relationship of medicine and economic development. Relationship of disease and epidemics with economic factors is examined.

60803 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE VIETNAM WAR.
Traces the history of pre-European Vietnam, French conquest, Indo-China War, roots of US involvement, the course of the US war, US domestic developments, and events in post-1975 Socialist Republic of Vietnam.

60813 GRADUATE READINGS IN US MILITARY HISTORY.
Traces the role of the armed forces in American society through a study of the origins and development of military institutions, traditions, and practices. Traces principal wars, including their causes, course, and effects, and treats the effects of leadership and new technologies.

60903 GRADUATE READINGS IN LATIN AMERICA, THE COLONIAL PERIOD.
Examination of primary and secondary sources relating to the Iberian and native backgrounds, the evolution of colonial institutions, and the independence movements in Latin America.

60913 GRADUATE READINGS IN LATIN AMERICA, THE NATIONAL PERIOD.
Examination of primary and secondary sources relating to the colonial inheritances influencing national development, the efforts at modernization in the nineteenth century, the social revolutionary movements of the twentieth century, and United States-Latin American relations.

60923 GRADUATE READINGS IN UNITED STATES-LATIN AMERICAN RELATIONS.
Examination of early relations among the independent republics, the impact of the Monroe Doctrine, the Pan American movement, and the rise of and challenge to U.S. hegemony in Latin America using both primary and secondary sources.

60933 GRADUATE READINGS IN REVOLUTION IN LATIN AMERICA.
Examination of revolutionary theory and revolutions in Latin America using primary and secondary sources.

60943 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE SPANISH BORDERLANDS.
Study of the clashing and mingling of cultures in regions formerly held by Spain in the southeastern and southwestern United States based on primary and secondary accounts.

60953 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF ARGENTINA AND CHILE.
Review of primary and secondary sources relating to the development of southern South America from colonial times to the present.

60963 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF BRAZIL.
The growth of Brazil from its colonial origins to its rank as a major nation is traced using primary and secondary accounts.

60983 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE INDIANS OF MIDDLE AND SOUTH AMERICA.
Use of primary and secondary sources to examine the major pre-Columbian civilizations, the impact of the Iberian intrusion, and the role of the indigenous population in modern national life.

60993 GRADUATE READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF MEXICO.
Evolution of Mexico from colonial times to contemporary oil power based on primary and secondary sources.

70980 MASTER'S THESIS.


70990 MASTER'S THESIS.


80083 HISTORY AS A PROFESSION: TEACHING, RESEARCH, SERVICE
. Covers all aspects of the teaching profession, including selection of readings, designing courses, preparation and delivery of class lectures, leading class discussions, preparing and grading exams, and professional expectations during and after graduate school.

80090 SUPERVISED TEACHING AT THE COLLEGE LEVEL.
All teaching assistants who are assigned to teach undergraduate courses must enroll for this course.

80200 SEMINAR IN WOMEN'S HISTORY.


80300 SEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY.


80400 SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY.


80500 SEMINAR IN BRITISH HISTORY.


80600 SEMINAR IN UNITED STATES HISTORY.


80700 SEMINAR IN MILITARY HISTORY.


80900 SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY.


90980 DISSERTATION.
Prerequisite: Written permission of chairman of the department.

90990 DISSERTATION.
Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy. Continuation of 90980. A minimum of 12 hours of dissertation credit is required.