Journalism

Master of Science in Journalism: News-Editorial (non-thesis)
Master of Science in Journalism: Advertising/Public Relations (thesis and non-thesis options)
Admission Requirements
Graduate Assistantships
Courses of Instruction
 
The Department of Journalism offers two degrees designed primarily for working media professionals: The Master of Science in Journalism: News-Editorial (print, broadcast, and Internet journalists) and the Master of Science in Journalism: Advertising/Public Relations.

Master of Science in Journalism: News-Editorial (non-thesis)
The Master of Science degree in Journalism: News-Editorial is for those students seeking to broaden their professional and intellectual growth, develop a critical understanding of the institutions, processes, and effects of mass communication while enhancing their skills in print, broadcast and media management. The degree is recommended for media professionals and others seeking a more extensive foundation for work in today's growing media markets.

The degree requires 36 hours, including Proseminar in Journalism and Mass Communication (50123), Research Methods (60113) and Media Ethics (60133); 18 additional hours of Journalism courses; and 9 hours of approved graduate courses from other academic units. A comprehensive examination is required after the completion of course work.

Master of Science in Journalism: Advertising/Public Relations (thesis and non-thesis options)

The Master of Science in Advertising/Public Relations is designed for practitioners seeking a broader understanding of research techniques, communication theory, ethics and law, as well as those who want to enhance their understanding of nuances in the practice, of advertising/public relations audiences and issues, and the processes and effects of mass and specialized communication.

The program helps students to develop advanced skills and knowledge in problem-solving and in dealing with management issues in a global society, as well as understanding the theoretical underpinnings of communication efforts that build better relationships with an organization's publics.

The degree requires 36 hours, including Proseminar in Journalism and Mass Communication (50123), Research Methods (60113) and Media Ethics (60133); 18 additional hours of Journalism courses; and 9 hours of approved graduate courses from other academic units. There are two tracks, one requiring a project and the other a thesis. The thesis track is for students who plan to pursue a doctorate.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must meet general University requirements as specified in the graduate catalog, as well as having completed 15 semester hours (five courses) in undergraduate journalism or have substantial professional experience in a mass communication discipline as determined by the journalism graduate faculty. The application must also include:

•An application form.
•Two official transcripts from all colleges or universities you have attended.
•A statement of no more than 250 words describing your academic and/or professional objectives.
•Three letters of recommendation.
•GRE General Test scores.

An applicant who does not meet the admission requirements will have to take up to 15 semester hours of undergraduate journalism or advertising/public relations courses that will not count toward the graduate degree. The number of semester hours needed will be determined by the graduate journalism faculty.

Graduate Assistantships

Graduate Assistantships are available for students pursuing either the M.S. in news-editorial journalism or the M.S. in advertising/public relations. These assistantships, which provide remission for tuition or remission for tuition plus a stipend, are typically made for a full academic year.
 
The following is a complete list of courses offered by this department. Go to Class Search on the Registrar's Page to see which courses are being taught this semester.

Courses of Instruction

Core Courses


50123 Proseminar in Journalism and Mass Communication.
Seminar devoted to the analysis and discussion of significant issues in journalism and advertising/public relations, with a focus on related literature, research areas and policy developments.

60113 Research Methods.
Introduction to quantitative and qualitative methodologies used in the study of mass communication, including surveys, content analyses, experimental designs, historical research and case studies. Prerequisite: Statistics or appropriate tools course and JOUR 50123.

60133 Media Ethics.
Principles of ethical journalism from the articulated ideals, codes and practice in the field. Examines the moral dilemmas facing media professionals from the approach of thinking through ethical problems, considering differences of judgment, and evaluating the performance of the media.

News-Editorial (Print and Broadcast) Courses


50163 Issues and Crises in Public Communication.
The course covers the way issues of public concern are detected by news media and by public relations and advertising strategists as the issues develop, and it examines how communication of government policies as well as corporate and non-profit organizations concerns affect perceptions and subsequently public opinion.

50173 International Reporting.
The course will critically analyze the coverage of international affairs in U.S. print and broadcast media. It will help the student develop competency in international journalism through the theory and practice of journalism and mass communication as they relate to international development, East-West discourses, and the flow of news and information.

50183 Media Management and Leadership.
Dramatic changes in technology and in the media's role in converging technologies require new management and leadership techniques and paradigms. Students will discuss existing case studies examining these changes. This course will give students a survey of some of the latest management and leadership theories, including a new sense of social responsibility. They will apply these theories to a number of different, competitive, structural, motivational, strategic, and organizational problems of the media, primarily by solving problems in existing case studies and by writing original case studies.

50193 Economics and Finance of the Media.
The course will examine the economic environment and financial practices of the mass media, including the World Wide Web. The course will examine how the media are affected by advertisers, competition, financial markets, and other economic forces. Understanding and structuring debt and equity, valuing media companies, and writing a business plan are included in the course work.

60153 Project in Broadcast Journalism.
This course will allow the student to take a real-world problem or opportunity that has a strong research component and develop it for course credit and for application on the job. The course is designed to afford students interested in broadcast journalism the opportunity to identify and extensively research a community or a broadcast issue or problem.

60163 Project in Print/Internet Publications.
This course will allow students the opportunity to take a workplace problem that has a strong research element and develop it for application on the job. Such a project could be developing a proposal for a series of stories on a major issue, preliminary work on an investigative series using social science research techniques, performing a management case study, conducting research on readership or identifying the type of sources used in stories.

60970 Special Problems in Journalism.
A conference course designed to give an individual student or group of students opportunities for additional specialized work in a particular area of concentration. (Maximum of 3 hours credit per semester; may be repeated for maximum of 6 hours credit.)

Advertising/Public Relations Courses

50133 Management of Public Relations and Advertising Departments/Firms or Agencies.
The course will examine management techniques, tactics, concerns and issues in handling public relations and advertising departments within organizations, corporate and nonprofit, and agencies or firms, from small independent operations to subsidiaries of larger entities.

50163 Issues and Crises in Public communication.
The course covers the way issues of public concern are detected by news media and by public relations and advertising strategists as the issues develop, and it examines how communication of government policies as well as corporate and non-profit organizations concerns affect perceptions and subsequently public opinion.

60173 Project in Advertising/Public Relations.
This course will allow students an opportunity to take a workplace problem that has a strong research component and develop it for course credit and for application on the job. Projects could be creating a campaign, developing a program for a special public, such as an ethnic group or a particular age group, exploring new policies to solve workplace difficulties or potential problems, studying the way different publics view the organization with the idea of placing that opinion more in line with management objectives. planning a Web site or any other workplace assignment that lends itself to research and writing a proposal.

60183 Public Relations and Advertising in International Practice.
An in-depth look at determinants that affect the way both nonprofit and profit-making organizations must function based on elements such as government, media ownership, culture, and social structures. This course will examine particularly commercial free speech as it functions in the United States and how communication efforts and persuasive strategies must be changed or adapted for other countries or regions.

60193 Global Cases and Campaigns.
A study of persuasive cases and campaigns that are international scope. Documented cases will be reviewed for insight into elements that contributed to the effectiveness of the effort, and campaigns, such as some United Nations health campaigns, will be studied for their tactics and strategy as adjusted for different cultures.

60980 Special Problems in Advertising/Public Relations.
A conference course designed to give an individual student or group of students opportunities for additional specialized work in a particular area of concentration. (Maximum of 3 hours credit per semester; may be repeated for maximum of 6 credit hours.)

70980 Thesis.
By permission only.

70990 Thesis.
By permission only
 
General Courses

50143 Social and Cultural History of the Media.
Seminar designed to explore the history of mass media. Issues discussed in this class will improve historical knowledge about the mass media and give a foundation for understanding the professional development of journalism and mass communication.

50153 Cultural Imperatives in International Communication.
Critical study of international discourse within a cultural context. Dependency theory, political and socio-economic factors affecting communication and relations in the context of world affairs. Questions of media imperialism, ideology, monopoly of knowledge, cultural narratives and post-colonial discourses.

60123 Mass Communication Theory.
Theoretical approaches to communication; examination of literature in the field including approaches and models. Emphasis on processes and effects that affect mass communication practices and media.

60143 Literature of Mass Communication.
Examination of literary works in journalism and mass communication. The course is designed to connect a journalism education to broader social science concepts in a manner that should stimulate critical thinking about the role of the media in American and international societies.