Chemistry

Graduate Program for the M. A. or M. S. Degree
Graduate Program for the Ph.D. Degree
Courses of Instruction

Available on the Master of Arts, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy Degrees.

Prerequisites:
A baccalaureate degree in Chemistry from an approved college or university with an academic record meeting the standards established by the University. Students who have majored in related areas will be considered if it is believed that the relevant undergraduate chemistry background can be acquired during the first year of graduate study.

General Requirements:
All graduate students must satisfy the core course requirements in three out of four areas of chemistry. This may be accomplished through placement examination or coursework. Courses are selected from the following: Biochemistry (50133), Organic Chemistry (50223), Physical Chemistry (50282 and 50291), and Inorganic Chemistry (50163). A student may satisfy the requirement by making a grade of "B" or better in the appropriate course or by successfully passing examinations in the fields. The examinations are at the level expected for an ACS-certified B. S. degree. Normally, these examinations are given during the week prior to the beginning of the fall and spring semesters. A student may take a given examination no more than twice. All graduate students must satisfy the requirements in two areas within the first 12 months and all three requirements by the end of the second year. The progress of each graduate student is evaluated at the end of each semester. All students are to participate in a departmental seminar program.

All graduate students are required to complete satisfactorily a course in laboratory safety.
Graduate Record Examination: The examination must be taken by all entering graduate students. Normally, a student must submit the results of the exam to the chemistry department before being admitted. In all cases the examination must be taken before the end of the student's first semester residence in the program.

The time required for part-time students to meet requirements may be modified upon recommendation of a committee composed of the chair and two faculty advisers.

Graduate Program for the M. A. or M. S. Degree


M. S. (thesis option):
A total of at least 30 approved hours including at least 15 in chemistry and 6 in thesis. Each student will defend his/her thesis in an oral examination.

M. A. (non-thesis option):
A total of 36 approved hours including at least 24 in chemistry with no more than 6 hours of credit in Chemistry 50120, 50230, 60110, 60240, 60260, 60270 and 60280. Each student is also required to pass an oral examination based upon his/her program of study.

The teaching experience is considered an important part of the graduate training program. Each student is required to participate in a minimum of two but usually no more than four semesters of teaching.

Graduate Program for the Ph.D. Degree


The Ph.D. Degree program in chemistry is comprised of the following components.

1. Lecture courses to provide the student with extensive depth and breadth of knowledge in major areas of chemistry.

2. A seminar program designed to supplement the traditional course program with presentations given both by visiting scholars and by TCU students and faculty. Graduate students are required to present one departmental seminar on a topic selected from the current literature but not related to his/her research. This is normally given in the third semester and a second seminar describing the student's Ph. D. work is given in the last semester in residence.

3. A cumulative examination program designed to inform the faculty of the student's knowledge and ability in his or her field and to guide the student in his or her own development. These examinations are given four times per semester during the academic year in the areas of inorganic, organic, physical chemistry and biochemistry. In general, they are based on advanced course work and/or the current chemical literature. A student is expected to begin taking cumulative examinations no later than the beginning of the third semester. Once the cumulative examinations are begun, the student must pass three during the first three semesters and a total of five within four semesters. Part-time students should consult with their faculty adviser concerning time limitations associated with the cumulative examinations.

4. An original research proposal covering a feasible research plan within their area of interest but outside their current research efforts. The proposal is to be evaluated by a given student's supervisory committee on a pass/fail basis, defended in oral presentation before the supervisory committee, and should be completed by the end of the semester following completion of the cumulative exams. Upon completion of the proposal defense, a student is formally admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. Admission to candidacy must occur at least one full semester before graduation.

5. A teaching experience that is considered an important part of the graduate training program. Each student is required to participate in four semesters of teaching, normally as an assistant in an undergraduate laboratory course. During these semesters he/she will be enrolled in CHEM 50120.

6. A dissertation that is based upon the successful completion of an original research project. Each student will defend the dissertation in an oral examination before his/her supervisory committee.
The following is a complete list of courses offered by this department. Go to Class Search to see which courses are being taught this semester.

The following is a complete list of courses offered by this department. Go to Class Search on the Registrar's Page to see which courses are being taught this semester.

Courses of Instruction

50001 LABORATORY SAFETY.
Required of all graduate students in chemistry, this course deals with the safe handling of chemicals, the inventory and safe disposal of chemicals, safe handling of radioactive materials and lasers as well as details of federal, state and city regulations that apply to safety in academic and industrial laboratories. The course is also required of students who will be handling radioactive materials and is highly recommended for all other graduate students in the physical sciences.

50111 LABORATORY GLASSBLOWING.
One 4-hour laboratory period per week. An introduction to the preparation of laboratory research equipment constructed of sodium and borosilicate glass.

50120 TEACHING OF CHEMISTRY.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Members of this class act as chemistry laboratory assistants. Techniques of laboratory instruction are illustrated and the importance of laboratory safety is stressed. (1-3 sem. hrs.)

50133 BIOCHEMISTRY.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 30133, 40113 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. A general survey of structure and function of biologically important compounds, with methods of analysis.

50143 BIOCHEMISTRY.
Prerequisite: Chemistry or Biology 50133. Biosynthesis, Replication of DNA, Synthesis and Processing of RNA and Proteins, and special topics, e.g., brain and muscle function, hormones and signal transduction, cancer, development, etc.

50162 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY.
One hour lecture and one 4-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 50163 or concurrent registration. The laboratory emphasizes the synthesis, characterization and transformations of inorganic species.

50163 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY.
Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent registration in Chemistry 40123. A survey of topics in modern inorganic chemistry with emphasis on synthesis, bonding and the mechanisms of reactions.

50173 CHEMICAL INSTRUMENTATION.
Two hours lecture and one 4-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent registration in Chemistry 40123. Modern instrumental techniques applied to both inorganic and organic systems. Ultraviolet, infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, vapor phase chromatography, polarography and various electrochemical methods of analysis are covered.

50182 BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY.
Two 4-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent registration in Chemistry 50183. Physical chemical principles applied to biochemical systems.

50183 BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY.
Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 40133. Biological systems are discussed from the viewpoint of physical chemical theories and methods.

50223 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.
Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 30132, 30133 or permission of instructor. A detailed study of stereochemistry, important organic reactions and mechanisms, organic syntheses and fundamentals of synthetic design.

50230 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN CHEMISTRY
Credit and hours to be arranged. Advanced work in biochemistry, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry to be determined by the previous preparation and interests of the individual student.

50263 PHYSICAL-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.
Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 30133 and prior or concurrent registration in Chemistry 40123. An introduction to modern structural theory and reaction mechanisms. Includes a discussion of physical methods.

50273 INORGANIC REACTIONS.
Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 50163 or permission of the instructor. An advanced study of the preparative and derivative chemistry of important classes of transition metal and main group element compounds.

50282 ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY.
Two hours lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 40123. An introduction to Quantum Chemistry and Statistical Thermodynamics is presented. Continuation of Chemistry 40113-40123.

50290 CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 40113 or permission of instructor. An introduction to the applications of thermodynamics in chemistry. (1-3 hours of variable credit)

50502 BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY.
Two four-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 50143 or concurrent registration.

50783 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY.
(See Geology 50783) Prerequisites: CHEM 10113-10123 and CHEM 10122, or CHEM 10114-10124 or permission of the instructor. Three hours of lecture per week. Chemistry of water, soil, energy, and air as related to environmental problems. Subjects include: nutrients and eutrophication, fluorocarbons, sulfur and nitrogen oxides, Eh-pH relationship, natural carbonate reactions, and cation exchange phenomena.

50993 NEUROCHEMISTRY.
Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 50133 or permission of instructor. The elucidation of biomedical phenomena that subserve the characteristic activity of the nervous system or are associated with neurological diseases.

60110 SEMINAR.


60123 CHEMISTRY OF HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 50223 or equivalent. The synthesis and reactions of the principle heterocyclic systems, including some related natural products.

60120 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 50163 or permission of instructor. Significant advances in inorganic chemistry with emphasis upon material taken from recent literature. The subject matter will be fitted to the needs and interests of the class.

60130 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 50143. Specialized aspects and new developments in the field.

60140 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 50223 or equivalent. Recent advances in theoretical and synthetic organic chemistry. Highly specialized areas of organic chemistry may be taken up according to the needs of the class.

60150 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Topics of current interest in physical chemistry. The subject matter will be selected to meet the needs and interests of the class.

60240 GRADUATE RESEARCH IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY.


60260 GRADUATE RESEARCH IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.


60270 GRADUATE RESEARCH IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY.


60280 GRADUATE RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY.


60313-60323 QUANTUM CHEMISTRY.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 50282, Differential Equations is recommended. A brief review of the physical and historical background of quantum theory. The mathematical formalism along with some exactly solvable problems. Considerable time is spent on the approximate methods which are most applicable to chemical systems and allow a qualitative understanding of delocalization energies, spectra and chemical reactivity.

60333 STATISTICAL MECHANICS.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 50290. After a brief mathematical introduction, the equilibrium theory of statistical mechanics is developed and used to interpret the laws of thermodynamics from the molecular standpoint. A detailed study of the relationships between the thermodynamic functions of gases, liquids and solids and their structure on the molecular scale.

60500 SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY OF BEHAVIOR.
Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Weekly discussion in current topics in the Chemistry of Behavior. (Same as Psychology 60500).

70771
Selected when enrolling only for non-thesis examination or preparation for the examination.

70980 THESIS.


70990 THESIS.
Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy. Continuation of 70980.

90980 DISSERTATION.
Prerequisite: Written permission of the Chair of the Department.

90990 DISSERTATION.
Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy. Continuation of 90980. A minimum of 12 hours of dissertation is required.