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English



Requirements for the B.A. degree with a major in English.
Requirements for the B.A. and B.S. degrees with a minor in English.
Courses of Instruction

(ENGL)

Available as a major on the B.A. degree and as a minor on the B.A. and B.S. degrees.

English majors who plan to pursue Departmental Honors must be members of the University's Honors Program and enroll in ENGL 30003 in the junior year and ENGL 40003 in the fall semester of the senior year.

Pass/No-Credit. Courses for the major may not be taken on a pass/no credit basis.

Requirements for the B.A. degree with a major in English.

Each student forms a program of study in consultation with a faculty adviser in English. It is possible to concentrate in writing or literature if the student chooses.

General requirements:

To earn a major in English, students must complete 30 hours in English (exclusive of 10803, 10833, and 20803). Of these, at least 24 hours must be in upper-division English courses (30000 level and above). No more than 6 hours of lower-division credit may be applied to the major.

ENGL 30973 and 50970, courses in special topics which change from semester to semester, usually satisfy one or more of the requirements for majors. Consult the Department for information on these courses or check our website.

Specific requirements:

To earn a major, students must complete at least 6 of the 30 hours in courses in pre-1800 materials in American Literature, British literature, or Rhetorical Traditions. Select from this list (or consult the Department): 20433, 20603, 20633, 20913, 30113, 30253, 30413, 30423, 30433, 30583, 30623, 30633, 30643, 40403, 40413, 40423, 40453, 40483, 40493, 40653. Most of these courses can also be used to satisfy one of the distribution requirements listed just below in categories a, b, d, and e.

These additional distribution requirements apply:

a. 6 upper division hours of American literature, selected from this list: 30133, 30143, 30503, 30513, 30533, 30543, 30553, 30563, 30573, 30583, 30593, 30693, 40583;

b. 6 upper division hours of British literature, selected from this list: 30113, 30123, 30413, 30423, 30433, 30443, 30453, 30623, 30633, 40413, 40423, 40433, 40443, 40453, 40463, 40693;

c. 3 upper division hours of writing, selected from this list: 30213, 30223, 30233, 30263, 30273, 40203, 40213, 40223, 40243, 40273, 50243;

d. 3 upper division hours of either language theory, literary theory, or rhetorical theory, selected from this list: 30103, 30243, 30253, 30273, 30283, 30303, 30313, 30323, 40123, 40323, 40333;

e. 12 elective hours of any courses offered by the Department of English; of these, at least six hours must be at the upper division.

Requirements for the B.A. and B.S. degrees with a minor in English.

To earn a minor, students must complete 18 semester hours in English (exclusive of 10803, 10833, and 20803). Of these, 9 hours must be in upper-division courses. These distribution requirements apply:

a. 3 hours of British literature, selected from this list: 20403, 20433, 30113, 30123, 30413, 30423, 30433, 30443, 30453, 30493, 40413, 40423, 40433, 40443, 40453, 40463, 40693;

b. 3 hours of American literature, selected from this list: 20503, 20533, 20583, 30133, 30143, 30503, 30513, 30523, 30533, 30553, 30563, 30573, 30583, 30593, 30693;

c. 3 hours of writing, selected from this list: 10203, 30213, 30223, 30233, 30243, 30253, 30263, 30273, 40203, 40213, 40223, 40233, 40243, 40253, 40273, 50243;

d. 9 hours of elective English courses, chosen from any category.

The following is a complete list of courses offered by this department. Go to Class Search on Registrar's Page to see which courses are being taught this semester.

Courses of Instruction

These general prerequisites apply to all upper-division English courses: ENGL 10803 (or 10833) and at least one 20000-level English course. Specific prerequisites also apply to some courses, as noted in their descriptions below.

Approaches to Literary Studies

10103 INTRODUCTION TO FICTION. Reading and analysis of prose fiction by a variety of authors. The course may focus on a specific historical period or may cover a more extensive time span. Students will become familiar with interpretive strategies and will examine the course texts in relation to literary antecedents, the conventions of various genres, and the cultural circumstances of composition.

10113 INTRODUCTION TO POETRY. Reading and analysis of a wide variety of American and British poetry. The goal of the course will be to help students understand that poetry is not difficult and dull, but understandable, worthwhile, and enjoyable.

10123 INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA. Reading and analysis of the various dramatic genres.

30103 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY THEORY. Prerequisite: One literature course and sophomore standing (24 hours). An introductory investigation into the peculiar aesthetic problems involved in reading and interpreting literary language. Particular attention is given to the tensions between literature, readers, and cultural contexts. Both traditional and contemporary approaches are examined. Readings range from folk tales to literary classics to recent writing in the philosophy of language.

40123 LITERARY CRITICISM. An historical study of major developments in the theory of literature since Plato. The first half of the course surveys representatives of the most important positions, the second half surveys how these positions remain influential in 20th century thought.

Writing Workshops

10803 INTRODUCTORY COMPOSITION: WRITING FROM SOURCES. Prerequisite to all advanced writing courses at TCU. Strategies for reading, evaluating, and responding to written texts in academically productive ways, and for revising and editing students' own work. The course also teaches students how to present their own ideas and how to incorporate the ideas of others into their own writing. Course activities include writing summaries, analyses, syntheses, and arguments.

20803 INTERMEDIATE COMPOSITION: WRITING WITHIN COMMUNITIES. Prerequisite: English 10803 and sophomore standing (24 hours). Strategies for adjusting one's writing to a variety of tasks, genres, contexts, and audiences. The course also teaches research techniques, with an emphasis on identifying sources that are valuable to a given community and building an argument from them. Course activities include critical reading, collaborative writing and editing, and revising for style.

Studies in Writing and Rhetoric

10203 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING. Workshops in which students present their writing (fiction, poetry, drama, creative nonfiction) for class analysis will be complemented by lectures on the genres and readings that exemplify outstanding technique.

30213 ADVANCED COMPOSITION. A development of the principles, primarily of exposition, into a more advanced level of composing than might be expected of the first-year student.

30223 TECHNICAL WRITING AND DOCUMENT DESIGN. A course in practical communication with a concentration on report writing, including oral presentations and use of visual materials. Assignments are tailored to fit students' major fields and professional interests. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 30223 and ENGL 40243.

30233 THE ESSAY. Primarily a writing course with an emphasis on developing a personal style appropriate to private journal, letters, or magazine journalism, the course includes reading of major essayists from the Renaissance to the present.

30243 RHETORIC IN SOCIAL INTERACTION. Appropriation of the vocabulary, taxonomies, and strategies of classical and modern rhetoric for the purposes of critical inquiry into contemporary communication and behavior.

30253 RHETORICAL TRADITIONS. An introduction to the ideas, issues and individuals that shaped rhetoric and its relationship to literature and poetics, including the relationship between orality and literacy, the impact of cultural and religious views on discourse, and the role of technology in communication.

30263 STYLE AND USAGE. Analysis of the ways in which writers deploy vocabulary and syntax to create a prose voice that is responsive to the demands of audience, purpose, and occasion.

30273 ARGUMENT AND PERSUASION. Analysis of the logic by which writers construct arguments; analysis of the various means that writers use to persuade an audience; practice in writing one's own argumentative and persuasive discourse.

30282 CYBERLITERACY. This course will investigate issues related to cyberliteracy: what it means to read, write, communicate, and make knowledge in a digital world. In particular, the course will consider how computer technologies challenge traditional notions of literacy, identity, and community.

40203 CREATIVE WRITING-FICTION. An advanced fiction-writing workshop, focusing on the growth of students' own work. Enrollment requires instructor's permission.

40213 CREATIVE WRITING-POETRY. An advanced poetry-writing workshop, focusing on the growth of students' own work. Enrollment requires instructor's permission.

40223 CREATIVE WRITING-DRAMA. An advanced drama-writing workshop, focusing on the growth of students' own work. Enrollment requires instructor's permission.

40233 WRITING FOR PUBLICATION. A survey of the possibilities of writing for magazine publication and the construction of essays and articles for specific markets.

40243 PROFESSIONAL WRITING AND EDITING. A course in writing and editing appropriate to diverse professions. Examples from the writing of lawyers, scientists, and other professional writers are used as models and for editing practice. Students learn to write prose that is lucid, concise, and graceful. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 30223 and ENGL 40243.

40253 PROPAGANDA ANALYSIS AND PERSUASION. The nature of persuasive discourse and social movements involving propaganda explored through illustrations and theories that facilitate their understanding.

40273 WRITING INTERNSHIP. Prerequisites: 60 credit hours; GPA of 3.0, English GPA of 3.0; approval of the department. Students are placed with agencies in publishing or related fields for workplace experience. Duties, varied to fit the needs and opportunities associated with the participating agencies, generally include writing, editing, and production of published documents.

50243 TEACHING WRITING. A course for teachers of English, combining theories of composition with practical pedagogy and classroom strategies for the teaching of writing. Readings in current theories of composition and in-class writing.

Studies in Language

30303 MODERN GRAMMAR. A survey of modern approaches to English grammar, traditional, structural, and transformational, with an emphasis on generative-transformational theory. Students are introduced to modern developments in phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics as time permits.

30313 INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE STUDY. A general survey, for the nonspecialist, of language history, structure, acquisition, and diversity.

30323 COMPARATIVE LINGUISTICS. In this course, we will examine the differences among language varieties. In the process, we will explore the ways in which language is shaped by how people use and view it and the ways in which it affect those who use it.

40323 HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE. The study of the origins and development of Modern English.

40333 LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY. An introduction to the ways in which social organizations influence the development of language and language creates cultural patterns.

Studies in British Literature

20403 MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS. Studies of texts by major British writers from the beginnings of English literature to the present. Texts vary by semester.

20433 INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE. Introduction to and analysis of 6-7 plays, with reference to the sociocultural context in which the plays were composed and the ways they (and their author) have been interpreted and appropriated since the late sixteenth century. This course is designed for undergraduates with little or no preparation in literary studies.

30113 BRITISH LITERATURE TO 1800.
30123 BRITISH LITERATURE SINCE 1800.
Two period surveys, the first of medieval and early modern literature, and the second of nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature. Both courses will consider literary antecedents, the conventions of various genres, the cultural circumstances of composition, and interpretive strategies. Students may take both courses or either. The English Department recommends that ENGL 30113 and 30123 be taken consecutively.

30413 BRITISH LITERATURE TO 1500. Prerequisite: ENGL 30113 or permission of instructor. A survey of Old and Middle English literature from Beowulf to medieval drama. Emphasis is on introducing a wide range of medieval poetic and narrative forms including epic, lyric and romance, and a selection of recurring themes such as pilgrimage, death and antifeminism. Some texts are read in modern English translations.

30423 EARLY BRITISH DRAMA. Survey of early British dramatic literature, from morality- and mystery-plays of the 15th century through revenge tragedies and city comedies of the 16th and 17th. The course examines drama as a cultural force and traces the growth of tragic and comic genres.

30433 RENAISSANCE POETRY. Survey of 16th- and 17th-century English verse, with particular attention to aesthetic, political, and religious functions of poetry; the status of poets in early modern England; and the effects of societal changes on the production of poetry in the period.

30443 TWENTIETH-CENTURY IRISH LITERATURE. A survey of drama, poetry, prose and film from all 32 counties of Ireland beginning with the Irish literary revival (exemplified by, for example, W.B. Yeats, Augusta Gregory, James Joyce, J.M. Synge) and concluding with Ireland's second renaissance (e.g., works by Seamus Heaney, Paula Meehan, Roddy Doyle, Brian Friel, and Neil Jordan).

30453 VICTORIAN NOVEL. This course examines the genre of the Victorian novel, asking why it emerges in this period to challenge the preeminence of poetry, why realism becomes its dominant style, and how particular novelists respond to the substantial changes occurring in British society, including industrialization, political reform, and changing relations between the sexes and classes.

30493 WOMEN POETS AND POETIC TRADITION. A survey of British, American and Anglophone women poets from the 16th century to the present. Emphasis will be given to women writers' engagement with, contribution to, and rewriting of poetic tradition; to the social and historical conditions affecting womens' poetic production; and to the relation between poetry, poetics, and theories of gender.

40403 CHAUCER. Prerequisite: 30113 or permission of instructor. An intensive study of Chaucer's major poetry, especially The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, in Middle English. Emphasis is on Chaucer as inheritor and innovator of medieval ideas about God, social order, gender, authorship, the morality of reading and the function of poetry. Some prior experience with early literature is expected.

40413 THE RENAISSANCE IN ENGLAND. The prose writers, dramatists, and poets of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England in relation to the cultural circumstances influencing and being influenced by their works. Topics may include the prospect and enactment of censorship; the centrality of the patronage system; courts and courtiers; changing views of monarchy and obedience; religious controversy; issues of gender, ethnicity, and class; literature and science; pseudo-nonfictional strategies; adaptations of the Bible, history, and mythology; and early book production and circulation.

40423 RESTORATION & 18TH CENTURY LITERATURE, 1660-1790. The poetry and prose of Behn, Dryden, Prior, Pope, Swift, Defoe, Thomson, Goldsmith, Gray, Johnson, Burney, Montagu, Burns, and others writing between 1660 and 1798.

40433 19TH CENTURY LITERATURE. A general survey of British literature from 1790-1900.

40443 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE. A general survey of British literature from 1900 to the present.

40453 BRITISH NOVEL TO 1832. Survey of the novel through the early 19th century.

40463 BRITISH NOVEL SINCE 1832. Survey of the novel from the mid-19th century to the present.

40483 SHAKESPEARE AND MARLOWE. Comparative study of several plays each by Shakespeare and Marlowe, placing their work in historical and social contexts. Reading includes historical documents and literary theory.

40493 ISSUES IN SHAKESPEARE STUDIES. An intensive study of 3-5 of Shakespeare's plays, their sources, performance history, substantive textual variants, the Elizabethan/Jacobean milieu in which the plays were composed, and the changing cultural conditions under which the plays were appropriated and reworked. The plays will be examined from a variety of interpretive perspectives. Topics to be considered include how changes in aesthetic values and sociopolitical concerns have affected editorial decision-making and the development of interpretive strategies, and why Shakespeare, one of a number of inventive early modern authors, has over the centuries been transformed into a cultural icon. ENGL 20433 is a recommended, but not required, prelude to this course.

Studies in American Literature

20503 MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS. Studies of texts by major American writers from the beginnings of American literature to the present. Texts vary by semester.

20533 THE AMERICAN DREAM. The American success dream as depicted and evaluated by major writers from Colonial times to the present.

20583 THE WESTERN. The American West and the Western hero in fiction, from James Fenimore Cooper to selected contemporary authors.

30133 AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1900.
30143 AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1900.
Two period surveys, the first from Colonial times to the Realist movement, and the second from the Realist movement to the present. Both courses will consider literary antecedents, the conventions of various genres, the cultural circumstances of composition, and interpretive strategies. Students may take both courses or either. The English Department recommends that ENGL 30133 and 30143 be taken consecutively.

30503 THE ROARING TWENTIES. A study of major American authors emerging in the Twenties, the cultural context for their art, and the influences of their achievements.

30513 AMERICAN POETRY. Survey emphasizing major poets from Colonial times to the present, including some poetic theory and criticism.

30523 SPORTS IN MODERN AMERICAN LITERATURE. An examination of the question of why so many of modern America's greatest authors employ sports-centered materials in their work. The readings will focus on baseball, football, basketball, and boxing.

30533 MODERN AMERICAN-JEWISH LITERATURE. A survey of the contributions of major American-Jewish authors to modern American literature. Prospective students need no special knowledge, since this is a course in American literature and not in Judaism.

30543 THE AMERICAN SHORT STORY. A survey of the American short story from its origins to the present.

30553 19th CENTURY AMERICAN NOVEL. Development of the American novel from its origins through the beginning of the 20th Century. Readings may include works by James Fenimore Cooper, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Louisa May Alcott, Henry James, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mark Twain, Sarah Orne Jewett, and Frank Norris, and will emphasize the novels' close ties to contemporaneous social, scientific, and political issues.

30563 AMERICAN DRAMA. Representative plays by the major playwrights of the American theater. Movements in theater and changes in theatrical conventions will provide a historical context. Limited readings in criticism.

30573 TRAVAIL AND TRIUMPH: A SURVEY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE. An analysis of the fiction, poetry, drama and essays of African-Americans from the slave era through post-civil rights, exploring chronologically the historical, social, cultural and racial contexts which shape the literature.

30583 EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE. The development of American literature from the period of earliest settlement through the era of the Early Republic, emphasizing the religious and socio-political evolution of American thought; attention will also be given to the development of imaginative literature, such as the novel. Among the figures included will be William Bradford, Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Susannah Rowson, and Charles Brockden Brown.

30593 AMERICAN FICTION, 1960 TO PRESENT. Studies the development of American fiction from 1960 to the present. Explores the relationship between literature and the concerns of contemporary society. Examines current trends and topics in American fiction and introduces students to recent literary analyses and critical debates.

30693 MULTI-ETHNIC LITERATURE. An analysis of the fiction, poetry, drama, and essays of major ethnic writers from the United States and other parts of the world. From a comparative angle, this course will explore the historical, social, cultural, and racial contexts that shape the literature. Several critical approaches will be taken to show interrelationships among writers.

40523 EMERSON AND THOREAU. Works of two 19th century American literary masters, read in their social and historical context.

40533 TONI MORRISON. An intensive study of the works of Toni Morrison. Attention will also be given to the cultural contexts (historical and contemporary) which structure the worlds of Morrison's fiction and influence the reception of her work.

40583 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN POETRY. Intensive study of contemporary American poets, poetic movements and relevant issues in aesthetics.

40593 FAULKNER. Examination of several of Faulkner's major Yoknapatawpha County novels and of Faulkner scholarship. The course will be a mixture of lecture and discussion.

Studies in Comparative Literature

20603 WESTERN WORLD LITERATURE I.
20613 WESTERN WORLD LITERATURE II.
Two period surveys, the first from ancient Greece to the Renaissance, and the second from the Enlightenment to the present. The primary emphasis will be historical, but individual instructors may vary the choice and treatment of texts to explore important developments of theme (e.g., the hero, journey, monsters) or genre (e.g., tragedy, epic, romance, lyric). Students may take both courses or either.

20623 WOMEN IN LITERATURE AND CULTURE. Using gender as a category for literary and cultural analysis, this course examines women writers who create forms of expression as well as contribute to traditional genres. The course may focus on a specific historical period or may cover a more extensive span. Writers may include Sappho, Marie de France, Behn, Wollstonecraft, Bronte, Austen, Dickinson, Woolf, Hurston, Welty, Plath, Morrison, Kingston, Tan, Joubert, McCafferty, Maraga, and Menchu.

20633 MYTHOLOGY. Study of major Greek and Roman myths, gods, and heroes, as these reflect cultural values and problems, and including some study of major literary forms.

20643 FABLE AND FANTASY. An examination of a wide range of texts, some that are classified as fable or fantasy literature as well as some that incorporate elements from these genres. The course may focus on a specific historical period or may cover a more extensive span. Texts may include The Arabian Nights, Lucian's A True History, Aesop's and Marie de France's Fables, medieval Arthurian romances, eighteenth- to twentieth-century versions of fairy tales, Ursula LeGuin's A Wizard of Earthsea, Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses, and Naguib Mahfouz's Arabian Nights and Days.

20653 THE ROMANTIC IMAGINATION. A study of the means by which the spirit of romanticism is embodied in literature since the late 18th century.

20733 SCIENCE FICTION. Historical development of science fiction as a literary genre with particular attention given to significant authors and themes.

20743 DETECTIVE NOVEL. Detective and suspense fiction in its social and historical context, illustrated by selected major works and authors.

20913 LITERATURES AND CIVILIZATIONS I.
20923 LITERATURES AND CIVILIZATIONS II.
This two-semester dwquence explores the role of literacy, rhetorical and dramatic expression in the development of cultural ideas, institutions and values. The first semester will focus on the cultural foundations of Britain and the United States; the second semester will focus on responses to these developments registered within various lilteracy and rhetorical texts from around the world.

30613 WOMEN'S LIVES: MEMOIR AND FICTION. Readings in contemporary women's writing that reflect women's lives and experiences with self, family, and society, with some attention to the theory and practice of writing the memoir. Discussion of works as both literature and social commentary.

ENGL 30623 MEDIEVAL LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. A survey of major thinkers and writers of the West from the fall of Rome to 1500, in part devoted to drawing a coherent picture of medieval thought: Heavenly versus earthly order; the nature of desire; the power of human agency; the value and uses of the past, including the classical past; gender roles. The often surprising ways in which individual writers deviate from and even criticize this cultural heritage.

30633 MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN WOMEN WRITERS. The development of beliefs about women's roles and characters and the ways these beliefs were accepted, challenged, or discredited. Authors studied are writers of prose fiction, poetry, drama, autobiography, biography, letters, religious visions. They may include Christine de Pizan, whose Book of the City Ladies (1405) attempts to counteract the negative view of women, and Aphra Behn, whose Oroonoko, or the Royal Slave (1688) questions hierarchizing of people according to gender, ethnicity, religion, and class.

30643 THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE. A study of Biblical works as examples of literary types; poetry, short story, essay, drama.

30673 KING ARTHUR IN LITERATURE AND LEGEND. Surveys the growth of the Arthurian tradition from legend and medieval literature into the 19th and 20th centuries, with special attention to Malory, Tennyson, Twain, and Bradley.

30683 POST-COLONIAL ANGLOPHONE LITERATURE. This course examines contemporary writers of English whose literary works were influenced or shaped by colonialism or its aftermath. Emphasis will be placed on writers from India, Australia, Ireland, Africa or the Caribbean.

30723 SHORT STORY. A survey of the development of the genre through the 19th and 20th centuries.

30733 SATIRE. Examines the nature and uses of satire, concentrating on the variety of satiric forms. Readings will include prose fiction, essays, and poetry written by European and American satirists.

30753 LITERATURE AND FILM. A study of aesthetic and ideological differences, considering both how various literary works have been filmed and how films images may be analyzed using interpretive techniques developed by literary criticism.

30773 INDIA: TEXTS AND TRADITIONS. A consideration of selected classic works of religious and literary imagination in Indian culture. Versions and interpretations of the Hindu epics Mahabharata and Ramayana will be examined in translation.

30783 WORKING-CLASS LITERATURE. A study of the working class in fiction, poetry, and essays. Some attention will also be given to portrayals of the working class on TV, in film, and in photography.

40653 RENAISSANCE LITERATURE AND THE 'NEW' SCIENCE. This course examines how and why artists and scientists in the century c. 1550-1650 interacted intellectually as they did. Topics include influences of scientific developments and discoveries upon European (chiefly British) letters; strategies used by writers to appropriate, revise, or contest scientific developments in astronomy, medicine, philosophy and other disciplines; and relationships between scientific and literary discourses of change.

40663 MODERN FICTION. Considerations of modernism as a literary movement with readings in modernist fiction. Among figures included will be Dostoevsky, Mann, Kafka, Ellison, Faulkner, Barth, and Barthelme.

40673 MODERN DRAMA. Close study of representative plays marking significant movements in modern theater, including realism, surrealism, absurdism, and the theatre of alienation.

40693 20th-CENTURY BRITISH AND IRISH POETRY. An intensive study of contemporary British and/or Irish poets, poetic movements and relevant issues in aesthetics.

40733 SOCIAL HISTORY OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. British and American children's literature of the 19th and 20th centuries, examined in its social and historical context and illustrated by selected major themes, works, and authors.

40743 THE LONG NOVEL. An intensive study of the pleasures and difficulties of long novels, which represent a unique genre of literature. Each semester focuses on three or four novels generally regarded as works of tremendous influence, but which may be too involved for study in survey courses. The novels will be selected from different periods, cultures, and languages.

30003 JUNIOR HONORS SEMINAR. Independent projects.

40003 SENIOR HONORS SEMINAR. Independent projects resulting in Senior Honors Thesis.

30973 DIRECTED STUDIES IN ENGLISH. These are special topics courses, and change from semester to semester. Most satisfy one or more requirements for the major. Consult the department or its website for further information.

 
SECONDARY EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Persons seeking to be certified to teach English at the secondary school level should consult the English Department liaison to the School of Education. The Department encourages these students to have an English adviser as well as an adviser in the School of Education or other departments.


SINGLE TEACHING FIELD IN ENGLISH: 36 hours in English. 24 of these hours must be earned in upper-division courses. Following these recommendations will also lead to a major in English upon completion.

The Department recommends:

A. 9 semester hours in American literature. Recommended courses: 30133, 30143, 30513, 30543, 30573, 30693.

B. 9 semester hours in British literature. Recommended courses: 20433, 30113, 30123, 40433, 40443, 40463, 40493.

C. 3 semester hours in Studies in Writing. Recommended courses: 30213, 30263, 50243.

D. 6 semester hours in language theory, literary theory, or rhetorical theory. Recommended courses: 30243, 30253, 30273, 30283, 30103, 30303, 30313, 40123, 40323.

E. 9 semester hours of elective courses offered by the Department of English. (For students who are in an early phase of their university studies in English, we recommend 10103, 10113, 20403, 20503, and 30723.)


DUAL TEACHING FIELD IN ENGLISH: 24 hours in English. 18 of these hours must be earned in upper-division courses.

The Department recommends:

A. 6 semester hours in American literature. Recommended courses: 30133, 30143, 30513, 30543, 30573, 30593, 30693.

B. 6 semester hours in British literature. Recommended courses: 20433, 30113, 30123, 40433, 40443, 40463, 40493.

C. 3 semester hours in Studies in Writing. Recommended courses:10203, 30213, 30263, 50243.

D. 3 semester hours in language theory, literary theory, or rhetorical theory. Recommended courses: 30243, 30253, 30273, 30283, 30103, 30303, 30313, 40123, 40323.

E. 6 semester hours of elective courses. (For students who are in the early phase of their academic preparation in English, we recommend 10103, 10113, 20403, 20503, and 30723.)