Introduction Faculty
International Initiatives
Center for Professional Communication
Educational Investment Fund
Special Scholarships and Awards
Organizations
Academic Policies
Admission to the Neeley School
Academic Review
Academic Advising
Pass/No Credit Option
Course Prerequisites
Transfer Policies
Three-Two Program
Courses of Instruction

Overview

The M.J. Neeley School of Business offers a program of study to prepare its students to contribute to the professional business world and the larger community. The Neeley School emphasizes a unified program of basic studies-humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, mathematics, economics and business. The concept of a balanced curriculum extends to the business studies. Although students may concentrate in a particular field of business, they all study the principles of accounting, decision sciences, ebusiness, finance, entrepreneurial management, and marketing.

A quality curriculum in business fundamentals is of the utmost importance to the Neeley School. The curriculum is developed and implemented by a faculty recognized as scholars and leaders in their respective fields. Regular input is provided by Neeley School corporate partners through advisory groups and frequent classroom visits by executives.

Additionally, the Neeley School seeks to provide its students with the distinctive competencies needed to compete and lead in the business world: effective communication skills, the ability to utilize business technology, an understanding of the global nature of business, and a sense of the value of making ethical business decisions.

The M.J. Neeley School of Business is fully accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business at both the undergraduate and the graduate levels.

Faculty

The men and women on the faculty represent an array of cultural backgrounds and bring to students a rich variety of academic training, teaching experience, research, consulting, scholarly publication, and business and community service. Several faculty members have authored widely-used texts in the field of business.

Teaching is of primary importance; the most senior professors teach at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Personal contact with students is encouraged through classes of moderate size. Through the use of audio and visual aids, conferences, business case analysis, software applications, and organizational studies, instructional theory is merged with practical and relevant situations.

Research is an important faculty activity. It enables faculty to stay in the forefront of their respective fields. Research activities feed back into the classroom to ensure that today's students will be prepared for the world as it is when they graduate and as it changes over their careers. Faculty research results have been published in many of the leading academic journals.

One of the real strengths of the Neeley School is its relationship with the business community. Numerous local, regional, national, and international organizations make up a vast network of corporate partners that are committed to accomplishing the goals of the Neeley School.

The Neeley School enjoys many benefits as a result of its corporate relationships including: internship opportunities, part-time and permanent job opportunities, scholarship support, classroom speakers, and mentors.

Perhaps the most visible members of this network are the Neeley School's International Board of Visitors. This distinguished group of forty executives from across the globe provides valuable feedback and program support and serves as a vital link between the Neeley School and other corporate constituents.

International Initiatives

The globalization of today's business environment dictates that learning experiences can no longer be compartmentalized into "international" and "domestic" arenas. Consistent with this philosophy, the Neeley School incorporates a global perspective throughout the undergraduate curriculum. Whether the students are studying Money & Banking or Sales Management, they will be challenged to consider the topic with an international perspective.

To assist the Neeley School in achieving this end, we have developed several partnerships with universities in Mexico, France, Germany, and Scotland. Through these partnerships, faculty members from each institution are invited to participate in exchange opportunities, serving as guest lecturers in their area of expertise. New programs are in development that will offer students and faculty short term reciprocal exchanges with partner institutions during the academic year.

We believe that creating globally-minded business leaders goes far beyond mastering the international perspective of business topics. True appreciation of the global environment requires cultural empathy, knowledge of a variety of languages and political and geographical awareness. To this end, the Neeley School offers the International Emphasis certification program. Through this program, dedicated students can earn a BBA in the major of their choice with an additional "International Emphasis" designation on their transcript. Specific details of the International Emphasis certification may be found on the following pages.

In order for students to think globally, they must become physically global. There is no substitute for experience. The Neeley School supports the many study-abroad opportunities available to TCU students, yet goes one step further. Intensive, field seminars, such as Summer-In-Germany (4 weeks) and Entrepreneurship in the UK (3 weeks), are coordinated by the Dean's Office. The goal of these partnerships is to expose Neeley School business students to the realities of the corporate environment in other countries. On-site tours and one-on-one interaction with executives from companies are included in these programs. These tours and interactions enable the programs to move beyond traditional "classroom based" exchanges. Students are required to use local transportation and tour historic sites. Hundreds of Neeley School students and dozens of Neeley School faculty have had the opportunity to experience these unique study abroad programs.

Center for Professional Communication

Through the M. J. Neeley Center for Professional Communication (CPC), the Neeley School offers a unique approach to helping students become proficient in business communication. The Neeley School has been rated consistently by The Princeton Review as one of the best business schools in the country for the development of strong communication skills.

The Center directs activities in the following six programs:

Communication Certification The Certificate is an award of merit presented to students who have participated at a level of excellence in a variety of activities and diagnostics assessed by the CPC.

Neeley School Classroom Support The Center provides assistance to faculty as they incorporate communication skills in their classes. Also, it provides coaching and assistance to students as they develop the business communication skills essential to corporate success.

CPC Technology Initiative The Neeley School encourages students to embrace newer communication technologies in an effort to improve efficiency and effectiveness in their business interactions. To that end, the CPC provides the only video conference center devoted to student use.

CPC Workshops and Clinics The CPC regularly offers noncredit workshops and clinics focusing on specific communication skills such as effective presentations, presentation graphics, dealing with presentation anxiety, collaborative writing, networking, intercultural communication, and many others.

Lifelong Skills Development The Neeley School seeks to develop a commitment to continuous communication skill development. Accordingly, the CPC ffers a variety of activities as well as information and referral for other communication resources on campus and in the community.

CPC Communication Culture Initiative A focus on communication is integrated across the curriculum so that assignments within all the functional areas emphasize the communication aspects as well as the content. The Neeley School seeks to model outstanding communication in all its activities.

Communication resources are housed in the M. J. Neeley Center for Professional Communication, located on the first floor of Charles Tandy Hall. Facilities include a modern video conference room. Specialized equipment includes a PictureTel System, a voice-activated camera, cart-mounted document cameras to transmit graphic displays, computers adapted for video transmission, and large-screen monitors. There are five specially equipped videotaping rooms for classroom recording, practice, or private review. The CPC's media station offers specialized graphics software, optical scanning, digital video editing, and hundreds of professional copyright-free business photographs for use in student projects. Selected software training packages are provided by the Center for grammar and style improvement, presentation graphics development, and other computer-assisted instruction.

Educational Investment Fund

The Educational Investment Fund is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students to invest real money while still in college. Approximately 18 students manage over two million dollars in assets of the William C. Conner Foundation. The participants in the Educational Investment Fund do intensive analysis of stocks and bonds and make buy and sell decisions.

The experience gained in the program is comparable to a year's work experience in the eyes of many potential employers and places the TCU graduate in an extremely advantageous job-search position. Hundreds of TCU students have participated in this program over the last 25 years and these ex-members represent a worldwide net-work of potential contacts for current members.

Special Scholarships and Awards

For students in accounting, the Accounting Excellence Award of the Texas Society of Certified Public Accountants and the TCU Accounting Department Award for Distinguished Service are granted each spring to outstanding graduating seniors. The Robin Elisa Boyer Memorial Scholarship and the Robert Schumacher Scholarship are awarded annually to seniors entering the Master of Accounting (Mac) Program. Outstanding junior accounting majors may be granted a Petroleum Accountants Society Award, a Deloitte & Touche Award, or the Institute of Management Accountants Award.

The Management Department presents three awards annually to outstanding Entrepreneurial Management majors: the Senior Scholar Award based on GPA and leadership contributions, the Outstanding Management Student Award for Leadership and Service sponsored by Texas Industries, Inc. and the Barbara J. Snell Award for Outstanding Leadership sponsored by the North American Mortgage Company.

The E-Business Program makes awards annually to outstanding students majoring in E-Business: the Senior Scholar Award based on GPA and leadership contributions and the Outstanding E-Business Student Award.

The Marketing Department grants eight awards annually to outstanding students: Marketing Senior Scholar Award (highest GPA), Outstanding Marketing Student Award (best overall marketing student), the Hoechst Marion Roussel Sales Management Award, the Earl Dyess Award, the International Marketing Scholar Award, the DSS Research Marketing Research Award (to a student with a strong interest in marketing research), the Marketing Application Project (for student contribution and leadership in the annual class promotional event) and the Marketing Department Excellence Award (student contribution to the field of marketing). Additionally, the TCU chapter of the American Marketing Association sponsors an award for students who demonstrate marketing leadership skills.

The Finance and Decision Sciences Department recognizes the senior who best exemplifies the ideal of an outstanding finance major with the Achievement Award of The Wall Street Journal. The Fort Worth Mortgage Bankers Association Award is given to a senior pursuing a career in real estate. The Finance/Decision Sciences Department also awards the "Professor's Award" for excellence in Finance and excellence in Decision Science. Additionally, a student is selected from among those participating in the Educational Investment Fund during the past academic year for the Outstanding Educational Investment Fund Student Award.

Awards given by student groups include the Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key.

Organizations

Alpha Sigma Gamma International Real Estate Society. The purpose of this society is to recognize and reward superior academic performance in the estate and real estate curricula, to encourage research and teaching in real estate and related fields, and to recognize individuals in real estate and related business areas who exemplify the intelligent and ethical application of real estate knowledge. Student membership is open to undergraduate and graduate students meeting specific academic criteria.

American Marketing Association. The TCU Collegiate Chapter of the American Marketing Association is open to all students. The club helps bridge the gap between marketing theory and practice. The club meets every other week, bringing in top companies and recruiters as speakers.

Beta Alpha Psi. The purpose of Beta Alpha Psi, national student accounting honor society, is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as basic to the accounting profession; to promote highest ethical standards in the study of accountancy; to develop high moral, scholastic and professional attainments in its members; and to encourage cordial relationships among its members and the accounting profession generally. Students are invited on the basis of scholarship.

Beta Gamma Sigma. This national honor society for business students encourages and rewards scholarship and accomplishment among students, promotes education in business, and fosters integrity in the conduct of business operations. Only the top seven percent of juniors and the top ten percent of seniors are invited to join.

Collegiate Entrepreneurs Club. CEO! Empowers students through leadership training, professional development, and commitment to the discipline of entrepreneurship. There are on campus chapter meetings, interesting guest speakers, social gatherings, and a monthly newsletter. Students may attend the national conference and participate in a new business idea competition.

Delta Sigma Pi. TCU's chapter of this international fraternity tries to establish closer ties between the business world and the student. Its objectives are to promote a higher standard of business ethics, and to further the civic and commercial welfare of the community. The chapter takes various field trips to industries and sponsors speakers and panels.

Electronic Business Association. The mission of the EBA is to further the educational development of undergraduate Electronic Business majors through association with other students, faculty members, potential employers and other influential members of the community, thus cultivating a unified body of students and alumni.

Financial Management Association. For students with an interest in finance and related fields, the Financial Management Association provides a means of obtaining career information and access to business executives and faculty.

Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE). SIFE is a global, non-profit organization that allows students the opportunity to develop leadership, teamwork and communication skills through learning, practicing and teaching the principles of free enterprise, thereby improving the standard of living for millions in the process. SIFE teaches important concepts through educational outreach projects, including market economics, entrepreneurship, personal and financial success, and business ethics to better themselves, their communities and their countries. Each year, SIFE competitions are held worldwide, drawing together thousands of students and business leaders to pay tribute to these extraordinary educational outreach projects.

Society for Human Resource Management. The TCU Student Chapter of the Society for Human Resource Management provides students an opportunity to learn more about the practice of management, and in particular, human resource management. The chapter hosts guest speakers, takes field trips, and attends regional and state professional meetings. The chapter also hosts workshops and panels on a variety of current management topics for the benefit of the entire student body.

Academic Policies

Admission to the Neeley School

To become a business major, students must formally apply for admission to the Neeley School. Students will typically apply in their sophomore year for admission to upper-level courses (most 3000-level or above) to be taken in the junior year. All TCU students or students transferring to TCU who wish to become business majors should contact the M. J. Neeley School of Business Office of Undergraduate Admissions regarding admission policies, procedures, and deadlines.

Academic Review

The academic records of all pre-business students and business majors are reviewed following submission of grades at the end of the Fall and the Spring semesters. The minimum required TCU cumulative GPA for all pre-business students and business majors is 2.50. Students who do not meet the 2.50 minimum GPA requirement will be subject to the academic review policies of the Neeley Student Resource Center. Please contact the NSRC for additional information.

Academic Advising

Pre-business students in the Neeley School are assigned an academic advisor by the NSRC. Pre-business students who have applied and been accepted as a business major will also be assigned a faculty advisor within their major. The role of the faculty advisor is to provide specific information about the major and career guidance.

The Neeley Student Resource Center is open daily to answer the questions of all prospective and continuing students in the Neeley School. The NSRC coordinates advising, monitors academic progress of students, receives academic appeals, processes all transfer coursework, handles the changing of majors within the Neeley School, works with CLEP Test applications, directs study abroad procedures, and audits intent to graduate forms for graduating business majors.

In addition to NSRC and faculty advisors, the Neeley School has the "virtual advisor" on the Neeley School web page. www.neeley.tcu.edu/nsrc. During registration periods, peer advising by upper division business majors is also available to all Neeley Business students.

Pass/No Credit Option

Pre-business students or business majors may take up to 6 semester hours of courses on a pass/no credit basis. However, upper division business courses (30000-40000 level) may not be taken on a pass/no credit basis and applied to the BBA degree, unless the course is taught only on a pass/no credit basis. Students minoring in business are subject to the pass/no credit option policies of their major department.

Course Prerequisites

Course prerequisites include admission to the Neeley School as a business major, class standing, previous coursework, grades in previous coursework, and/or permission of the instructor. All course prerequisites should be observed and followed when enrolling in a course. The ultimate responsibility for knowing the prerequisite for a course lies with the student and is noted in this Bulletin. Course prerequisites are noted in the Courses of Instruction section of this Bulletin, and are listed on the TCU Registrar's web page www.reg.tcu.edu.

Transfer Policies

Review Process for Transfer Applicants into the Neeley School

Transfer students must first become pre-business students. Approval is not automatic, and admission to TCU does not guarantee the student admission as a pre-business student. The transfer student must complete at least 1 full semester at TCU as a pre-business student before becoming a business major. Students must apply to be business majors. Admission is competitive and approval is not automatic. Upon acceptance into the Neeley School as a business major, the student may begin taking Upper Division Business courses.

Continuing TCU Students Who Want to Transfer Credit From Other Institutions

Continuing TCU students will sometimes take courses at other universities and then transfer those credits to TCU. TCU requires prior written approval of the NSRC to take courses at another school for application to a student's BBA degree. Course credit will not be transferred into the Neeley School if prior approval by the NSRC has not been obtained.

Once a student is in the Neeley School, all business Lower Division Sequence Requirements courses, Upper Division Business Core and Major Course Requirements must be taken at TCU.

Non-Availability of Evening Programs

Although the Neeley School does offer some courses in the evening, an evening-only program is not available. Students wanting to take only evening courses should be aware that all required courses may not be offered during the evening.

Certification for Business Teaching

The M.J. Neeley School of Business cooperates with the School of Education by offering business courses for the academic specialization requirements for certification of high school business teachers. More information is available through the School of Education.

Three-Two Program

Available only to TCU undergraduates in participating TCU colleges and schools, the Three-Two Program allows students to combine a bachelor's degree in a non-business field with the Master of Business Administration (MBA) in only five years.

Students spend their first three years in the AddRan College of Humanities and Social Sciences, College of Science and Engineering, College of Communication, or College of Fine Arts completing the University Curriculum Requirements and the requirements of an approved major. By the end of their third year, Three-Two Program students must complete at least 100 hours in non-business courses, including sufficient coursework in mathematics to satisfy the MBA Program prerequisites. To be considered for admission to the MBA program, Three-Two Program participants must submit the usual MBA application during their third year of study, including scores for the GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test). Only Three-Two candidates demonstrating superior undergraduate academic performance and strong GMAT scores will be considered for admission.

If admitted to the MBA Program, the student completes the first 27 semester hours of the MBA program during the fourth year of study. These courses apply to both the undergraduate degree and toward the MBA degree. Candidates should work with their undergraduate academic advisors to determine how the courses will apply to the undergraduate degree (electives, minor requirements, area of emphasis, etc.). At the end of the fourth year, assuming that all other graduation requirements are met, the student earns his or her undergraduate degree. During the fifth year the student completes the remaining 27 semester hours of MBA courses.

Courses of Instruction

General Prerequisites for Business Courses

All 10000 and 20000 level business courses (except EBUS 20813) are open to all students, provided they meet the specific prerequisites for those courses.

All ACCT 30153, FINA 30153, DESC 30153, MANA 30153, and MARK 30153 courses are open to students who have been formally accepted into the Neeley School as Business majors or who are business minors. Once regularly scheduled course enrollments have been completed, other students will be added to these courses on a space available basis.

All upper level (30163 to 40970) business courses in ACCT, FINA, DESC, MANA and MARK, plus EBUS 30253, are restricted to students who meet the specific prerequisites for those courses (listed next to each course) and have been formally accepted into the Neely School as Business majors.

All EBUS 20813 to EBUS 40970 courses (except EBUS 30253, which is required of all business majors) are restricted to students who meet the specific prerequisites for those courses and who have been formally accepted into the Neeley School as E-Business majors.

ACCOUNTING (ACCT)

ACCT 20153 Principles of Financial Accounting. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. A study of the elementary concepts of financial accounting, emphasizing the measurement, recording and reporting of financial information according to generally accepted accounting principles.

ACCT 20163 Principles of Managerial Accounting. 3 hours. Prerequisite: ACCT 20153, and sophomore standing. Basic measures, techniques and approaches used by decision makers within both profit-making and not-for-profit organizations. Accounting and economic concepts of cost are studied in relation to performance measurement, planning, and both long- and short-term planning and decision-making, as are the common systems of product costing.

ACCT 30153 Intermediate Financial Accounting I. 3 hours. Prerequisites: ACCT 20163 and at least a "C" grade in 20153 and 20163, and must be a Business major or minor. In-depth study of the theory, principles, and procedures of the measurement, recording, and reporting of financial accounting information according to generally accepted accounting procedures. Intermediate I focuses on assets and their related income counterparts.

ACCT 30163 Cost Accounting. 3 hours. Prerequisite: ACCT 20163 and at least a "C" grade in 20153 and 20163, and must be a Business major. Cost accounting fundamentals, the use of standard costs and budgets for planning and controlling operations, and use of cost information for special decisions and long-range planning. Spring only.

ACCT 30253 Intermediate Financial Accounting II. 3 hours. Prerequisites: ACCT 30153 and at least a "C" grade in ACCT 20153, 20163, and 30153, and must be a Business major. In-depth study of the theory, principles and procedures of the measurement, recording, and reporting of financial accounting information according to generally accepted accounting procedures. Intermediate II focuses on equities and the related asset and income counterparts.

ACCT 30303 Introduction to Federal Taxation. 3 hours. Prerequisites: ACCT 20153, and must be a Business major. A technical examination of current federal income tax provisions with primary emphasis given to the taxation of individuals and secondary emphasis afforded the taxation of other entities. Designed to provide accounting majors with the knowledge and skills required to successfully evaluate the specific income tax implications of various fact situations. Fall

ACCT 40003 Senior Honors Research Paper. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Honors Section of MANA 30153, and must be a Business major. Preparation of a research paper in the student's area of concentration in business under the direction of an assigned staff member.

ACCT 40013 Professional Accounting Internship. 3 hours. Prerequisites: senior standing and admission to the MAc Program, and must be a Business major. A full-time internship with a public accounting firm, corporation, or governmental agency allowing the student to gain professional experience that will help integrate the theory and practice of accounting.

ACCT 40153 Advanced Accounting. 3 hours. Prerequisites: ACCT 30253, at least a "C" grade in ACCT 20153, 20163, 30153, and 30253 and senior standing, and must be a Business major. Intensive study of financial accounting focusing on special entity issues, such as proprietorships, partnerships, not for profit organizations, branch operations, and consolidation procedures, including foreign operations. Fall only.

ACCT 40223 Information Systems and Control. 3 hours. Prerequisites: ACCT 30153, EBUS 20263 (MANA/EBUS 20253). At least a grade of "C" in each prerequisite course, and must be a Business major. Systems analysis methodology and current developments in computer-based management information systems. Special emphasis is placed on subsystems relating to accounting information and the concepts of internal control as they relate to the design and audit of accounting information systems. Fall only.

ACCT 40970 Special Problems in Accounting. (1-6 sem. hrs.) This course may be repeated for credit, and must be a Business major.

BUSINESS (BUAD)

BUAD 10013 Contemporary Perspectives in Business. 3 hours. Prerequisite: 54 hours or less. Provides an overview of the theories, principles, practices and institutions that produce the goods and services and create most of the economic activity in modern societies.

BUAD 10970 Special Topics in Business. Special Topics in Business. (1-6 semester hours) This course may be repeated for credit.

BUAD 20970 Special Topics in Business. Special Topics in Business. (1-6 semester hours) This course may be repeated for credit.

BUAD 40013 Business Internship. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Completion of Neeley School lower division core and permission of instructor. Students gain practical exposure to business through participation in an internship in a business or community organization. Emphasis is placed on the development of applied skills in one or more of the business disciplines. Students learn about organizational realities and work demands.

BUAD 40970 Directed Study. Directed Study

DECISION SCIENCES (DESC)

DESC 20153 Statistical Analysis. 3 hours. Prerequisite: MATH 10283 or 10524. Basic statistical theory used in analysis and interpretation of numeric data. Topics covered include descriptions of frequency distributions, determination of discrete and continuous probabilities, estimation and tests of hypotheses, time series analysis, and regression and correlation analysis.

DESC 30153 Introductory Operations Management. 3 hours. Prerequisites: DESC 20153 or equivalent and junior standing, or consent of the instructor, and must be a Business major or minor. An introduction to the management of operations in manufacturing and services organizations. Examines the role of operations management in the production and distribution of goods and services, different types of production and service systems, various functional activities and decisions associated with the management of operations, and basic concepts and tools useful for decision making. Historical perspectives and emerging trends in operations management and its integration with the other functions are also covered.

DESC 30253 Introductory Operations Research. 3 hours. Prerequisite: DESC 20153 and junior standing, or consent of the instructor, and must be a Business major. Definition of business problems amenable to quantitative analysis. Topics covered include linear programming, transportation models, transshipment models, assignment models, sensitivity analysis, decision theory, inventory models, queuing, and forecasting techniques. Computer solutions to problems are considered.

DESC 30353 Regression Analysis. 3 hours. Prerequisite: DESC 20153 or equivalent, and must be a Business major. Simple and multiple linear regression analysis. Applications to business and economics. Additional topics include residual analysis, regression diagnostics, use of dummy variables, analysis of variance, and time series regression. Use of computer statistical packages is stressed.

DESC 40003 Senior Honors Research Paper. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Honors section of MANA 30153, and must be a Business major. Preparation of a research paper in the student's area of concentration in business under the direction of an assigned staff member.

DESC 40970 Special Problems in Decision Science. (1-6 sem. hrs.) This course may be repeated for credit.

ELECTRONIC BUSINESS (EBUS)

EBUS 10533 Freshman Seminar in EBusinesss. Prerequisites: Open to entering freshmen only. Topics may vary each time it is offered.

EBUS 20263 Information Technology with EBusiness. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. This course focuses on the planning, development and implications of business information systems. Emphasis is on information technology in a network environment.

EBUS 20813 E-Business Programming and Applications. 3 hours. Prerequisites: EBUS major. Students will cover such topics as security, privacy and legal issues. They will learn to start their own eBusiness business and build a site for their own business and compare businesses in various industries. They will learn the how an eBusiness compares to and contrasts from a land-based business with a hands-on approach. They course may not be taken pass/fail.

EBUS 30253 Info Tech Dev W/ Trends. 3 hours. Prerequisites: EBUS 20263 with a grade of at least a "C" and ACCT 20163, must be a Business major, and passing scores on basic spreadsheet application software exam. This course focuses on the planning, development and implications of business information systems. Emphasis is on information technology in a network environment.

EBUS 30813 E-Business Planning. 3 hours. Prerequisites: An EBUS major, EBUS 20813 with a grade of B or better. Students will learn how to analyze a business, division, or department for a Web presence. They will investigate how the eBusiness fits into the traditional roles for a business or industry. They will consider how the Internet impacts the business. Student will also apply communication skills (written, face-to-face, and presentation) in this course.

EBUS 30823 Data for E-Business. 3 hours. Prerequisites: An EBUS major, EBUS 20813 with a grade of B or better. Students will learn solid database principles. They will also be exposed to eBusiness data management concepts, such as data warehousing, the use of consumer data for marketing, the availability of financial data on the Internet, and data and information reporting.

EBUS 30833 E-Business Development. 3 hours. Prerequisites: EBUS major, EBUS 30813 with a grade of C or better; EBUS 30823 with a grade of C or better. Students will use the results of the eBusiness analysis to design and implement a Web presence. They will learn traditional project management techniques in this process. They should look at several different system development methods possible with eBusiness applications: SDLC, RAD, JAD, etc. Students will use team building, conflict, diversity, conflict resolution and other team applications as appropriate in this course.

EBUS 30843 Telecommunications Management. 3 hours. Prerequisites: An EBUS major, EBUS 30813 with a grade of C or better; EBUS 30823 with a grade of C or better. Students will examine the technical telecommunications requirements for business communications and collaboration. This course provides experience with both local area networks and wide area networks with special emphasis on Internet network technology and the client/server architecture. An understanding of the people issues in networking is an important component of this course.

EBUS 40013 Professional E-Business Internship. 3 hours. Prerequisites: An EBUS major, EBUS 30833 with a grade of C or better and EBUS 30843 with a grade of C or better and senior standing. A 240-hour internship with a corporation, a non-profit or governmental agency allowing the student to gain professional experience that will help integrate the theory and practice of management information systems. Internships must be approved by the department chair or another appointed designee.

EBUS 40813 E-Business Consultancy I. 3 hours. Prerequisites: An EBUS major, and EBUS 30833 with a grade of "C" or better; EBUS 30843 with a grade of "C" or better. This is the first of a two-course sequence (EBUS 40813 and EBUS 40823). Using a real company, the first course (EBUS 40813) starts the consultancy phases and the second course (EBUS 40423) completes the eBusiness analysis phase. While the students are building and implementing in the second semester they will be learning about the newest tools, topics and trends for use in the rapidly changing Internet environment. This two-semester sequence will allow them the extra time needed to complete the entire process of creating a real corporate Web presence from beginning to end. Students will work in teams that will last the entire two semesters. A team approach will be used to develop creative ideas and observe the processes and factors crucial to a successful eBusiness. The topics and trends section of this course will be constantly changing to reflect the dynamics of the Internet.

EBUS 40823 E-Business Topics and Trends. 3 hours. Prerequisites: An EBUS major, EBUS 40013 with a grade of C or better. Provides a more advanced inquiry into Electronic Business. This is a continuation of EBUS 40813. 3 hours. This is the second of a two-course sequence (EBUS 40813 and EBUS 40823). Using a real company, the first course (EBUS 40813) starts the consultancy phases and the second course (EBUS 40423) completes the eBusiness analysis phase. While the students are building and implementing in the second semester they will be learning about the newest tools, topics and trends for use in the rapidly changing Internet environment. This two-semester sequence will allow them the extra time needed to complete the entire process of creating a real corporate Web presence from beginning to end. Students will work in teams that will last the entire two semesters. A team approach will be used to develop creative ideas and observe the processes and factors crucial to a successful eBusiness. The topics and trends section of this course will be constantly changing to reflect the dynamics of the Internet.

EBUS 40970 Special Problems in E-Business. Special Problems in E-Business.

FINANCE (FINA)

FINA 10433 The Contemporary Investor: Freshman Seminar in Finance. Freshman Seminar in Finance.

FINA 30153 Financial Management. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Two semesters of accounting and junior standing, and must be a Business major or minor. Decision making in the financial environment. Emphasis on the acquisition and optimum management of funds. The relationship between financial management and economics, accounting, law and various functional areas of business is stressed. Working capital management, capital budgeting, short- and long-term financing, investment analysis and related topics.

FINA 30203 Money and Banking. 3 hours. Prerequisite: ECON 10223 and 10223, or consent of instructor, and must be a Business major. Nature, function, and operations of our money and banking system. Modern monetary and banking theory, monetary policy, and their relationship to domestic and international economic and financial problems and issues. Also listed as Economics.

FINA 30213 Investments I. 3 hours. Prerequisite: FINA 30153 with a grade of at least "C," and must be a Business major. Investment management from the perspective of the individual investor. Financial analysis of stocks, bonds, and other financial instruments. An examination of the securities markets and the trade-off between risk and return. Attention to contemporary investment problems.

FINA 30233 Investments II. 3 hours. Prerequisites: FINA 30153 and FINA 30213 with a grade of at least "C" in each course, and must be a Business major. A survey of the development and economic functions of options and futures and their markets. Includes development of pricing models, trading strategies, and portfolio management considerations.

FINA 30303 Insurance. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Must be a Business major. Fundamentals of major types of insurance, including life, fire, accident and health, automobile, worker's compensation, transportation, and fidelity and surety bonds. Designed to acquaint the student with the general principles of insurance and their application to personal and business situations.

FINA 30313 Real Estate Principles. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Must be a Business major. Introduction to real estate principles and practices, activities of real estate brokers and operators, transfer of real property and real estate securities, essentials of real estate law, practices incidental to ownership and control of real property.

FINA 30623 Real Estate Valuation. 3 hours. Prerequisite: FINA 30313 with a grade of at least "C," and must be a Business major. Theory, methods and principles of valuation; cost, market and income approaches to value; the appraisal process applied both to residential and commercial property.

FINA 40003 Senior Honors Research Paper. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Honors Section of MANA 30153, and must be a Business major.. Preparation of a research paper in the student's area of concentration in business under the direction of an assigned staff member.

FINA 40153 Advanced Financial Management. 3 hours. Prerequisite: FINA 30153 and FINA 30203 and credit for, or concurrent enrollment in FINA 30233, and must be a Business major. An advanced course in the application of the theory of corporate finance to real problems in business. Taught primarily by the case method, topics include financial analysis and planning, forecasting the financial needs of a firm, capital expenditure analysis, capital structure and distribution policies, merger and acquisition analysis, and corporate restructuring. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the firm's financial and operating decisions on the value of the firm's securities in financial markets.

FINA 40183 Educational Investment Fund. 3 hours. Prerequisite: FINA 30153 and FINA 30213, and must be a Business major. Admission by approval of the dean of the Neeley School. Participation in the operation of the Educational Investment Fund student-managed investment portfolio.

FINA 40193 Educational Investment Fund. 3 hours. Prerequisite: FINA 30153 and FINA 30213, and must be a Business major. Admission by approval of the dean of the Neeley School. Participation in the operation of the Educational Investment Fund student-managed investment portfolio.

FINA 40313 Management of Financial Institutions. 3 hours. Prerequisite: FINA 30153 and 30203 with a grade of at least "C" in each course, and must be a Business major, or consent of instructor. Problems of commercial banks and financial institutions, primarily from the perspective of the management of an individual institution, with emphasis on formulating appropriate policies concerning the asset, liability, and capital management of the firm.

FINA 40603 Real Estate Law. 3 hours. Prerequisite: MANA 20153 and FINA 30313 with a grade of at least "C" in each course, and must be a Business major, or consent of instructor. Acquisition and transfer of property; rights of adjoining owners; mortgages and liens; abstracts of title; recording; drafting of deeds, leases, mortgages, options. Especially for real estate salesmen and brokers, owners, tenants.

FINA 40613 Real Estate Finance and Investment Analysis. 3 hours. Prerequisite: FINA 30153 with a grade of at least "C," and must be a Business major, or consent of instructor. Investment value based on the present value of expected cash flows. Includes computer applications, the current income tax laws for real estate, mortgage law, sources of real estate credit including primary and secondary markets, government programs, and mortgage loan underwriting.

FINA 40623 International Finance. 3 hours. Prerequisite: FINA 30153 and FINA 30203 with a grade of at least "C" in each course, and must be a Business major, or consent of instructor. The international monetary system; speculation, hedging and arbitrage in foreign exchange and financial markets; financial management of the multinational firm; Eurocurrency and capital markets; and international banking.

FINA 40970 Special Problems in Finance. (1 - 6 sem. hrs.) This course may be repeated for credit.

ENTREPRENEURIAL MANAGEMENT (MANA)

MANA 10533 Interpersonal Influence in Business. Topics may vary each time it is offered.

MANA 20153 Legal and Social Environment of Business. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Legal and social aspects of business. Legal aspects and social impacts of common business transactions. The course is designed to assist the future businessman in the design and implementation of policies within the legal and social framework and to create awareness of the government pitfalls which would require professional advice.

MANA 20970 Special Problems in Management. (1-6 sem. hrs.) This course may be repeated for credit.

MANA 30153 Organizational Management. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing, and must be a Business major or minor. Tasks of the manager are studied in the context of his/her role as an administrative decision maker. Emphasis placed on understanding the organization as a system where the manager needs to examine a variety of variables in order to arrive at problem solutions. Management processes, system concepts, models for decision making, and behavioral concepts involving motivation, leadership, group activity, conflict and change are covered.

MANA 30203 Human Resource Management. 3 hours. Prerequisite: MANA 30153 with a grade of at least "C," and must be a Business major. The philosophy and major questions of policy in human resource management. Specific techniques, including job analysis, recruitment, selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisals; discipline, compensation, collective bargaining, and industrial relations are introduced to illustrate current practice, and are related directly to questions of policy or objectives.

MANA 30533 Introduction to Entrepreneurship. 3 hours. Prerequisites: ACCT 20153, ACCT 20163, MANA 30153 with at least a grade of "C", and MARK 30153; must be a Business major. Offers a broad view of different entrepreneurial efforts from small business to venture capital-backed high growth potential ventures. Particular attention is focused on the generation of ideas for new businesses and establishing their feasibility. This course is a prerequisite for more advanced entrepreneurship studies.

MANA 40003 Senior Honors Research Paper. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Honors Section of MANA 30153, and must be a Business major. Preparation of a research paper in the student's area of concentration in business under the direction of an assigned staff member.

MANA 40123 Managing the Emerging Venture. 3 hours. Prerequisites: ACCT 20153, ACCT 20163, MARK 30153, MANA 30153, with a grade of at least a "C" in MANA 30153, and must be a Business major. Includes coverage of aspects involved in operating a small business including accounting, financial controls, management and human resource practices, marketing and customer development, production, service level quality, and legal issues.

MANA 40143 New Venture Planning. Prerequisites: MANA 30533 (40133) and FINA 30153 with at least a grade of "C," and must be a Business major. Students will work through the process of developing a business plan for an entrepreneurial venture. The focus is on strategic assessment and preparing plans capable of attracting necessary financing for new entrepreneurial ventures.

MANA 40153 Strategic Management. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing and Business major. Final integrating course for the senior student. The policies and problems of management with respect to coordination of production, finance, marketing, human resources and accounting in a going concern under conditions of uncertainty.

MANA 40163 Ventures in Transition. 3 hours. Prerequisites: A business major and MANA 30533 with at least a grade of "C". This course examines the changes likely to affect an entrepreneurial venture as it matures. The focus of the course is on how to effectively manage the growth of an entrepreneurial venture. Other implications of growth will also be discussed, such as changes in the strategy of the venture, performance downturns, sale or liquidation of the business, acquisition of another business, and initial public stock offerings.

MANA 40223 International Management. 3 hours. Prerequisite: MANA 30153 with a grade of at least "C," and must be a Business major. Cross-cultural management skills. Understanding and managing differences and similarities within and between multinational enterprises in the contemporary world. Topics include culture, communication, politics, negotiations, and overseas assignments

MANA 40233 Skills for Effective Managers. 3 hours. Prerequisite: MANA 30153 with a grade of at least "C," and must be a Business major. A developmental approach to building skills essential for effective management in today's organizations and environment. This course will focus on cultivating such skills as team building, negotiation and conflict management, communication, personal productivity management, and other important competencies. Learning through active application and experiential exercises will be emphasized.

MANA 40753 Managing Business Ethics. 3 hours. Prerequisites: MANA 30153 with a least a grade of "C". This course addresses ethical conduct and social responsibility in organizations. A multi-level approach to ethical decision-making is explored. Students will apply individual, managerial, and organizational analyses to ethical dilemmas faced in the conduct of business.

MANA 40773 Leadership. 3 hours. Prerequisite: MANA 30153 with grade of "C" or better, and must be a Business major. Changes in the business environment have underscored the vital role that effective leadership plays in not only helping organizations survive, but to be self-determining and prosperous as well. This course is designed to help students learn both about leadership and about how to be more effective as a leader of others.

MANA 40970 Special Problems in Management. (1-6 sem. hrs.) This course may be repeated for credit.

MARKETING (MARK)

MARK 10533 Freshman Seminar in Business: Interpersonal Influences in Business. 3 hours. Prerequisite: First semester freshman only. Developing interpersonal influence skills for business. Includes coverage of interpersonal skills involved in personal selling, leadership, and management. Specific components include fundamentals of selling, the value of selling, making a sales presentation, leadership styles, building consensus, building commitment, team building, conflict resolution, negotiation, and ethical issues of interpersonal influence.

MARK 30153 Marketing Management. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, and must be a Business major or minor. The processes in our society by which needs and wants of consumers are anticipated and satisfied. An examination of a systems approach to and analysis of the movement of goods from the point of production to the point of consumption.

MARK 30233 Business Marketing. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or higher in MARK 30153, and must be a Business major. Explores the dynamics of business-to-business transactions. The course covers demand estimation, industry sales forecasting, competition analysis, organizational buying and business-to-business marketing strategies.

MARK 30253 Selling and Sales Management. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or higher in MARK 30153, and must be a Business major. An examination of the basic principles involved in personal selling and the administration of this function in the organization. Emphasis is placed on the sales executive's job, the duties and responsibilities, and the various roles played as an important participant in the making of marketing decisions.

MARK 30313 Supply Chain Management. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Must be a Business major. Supply Chain Management (SCM) has grown significantly in the last 10 years, and offers great opportunities to improve business performance. This course provides an overview of the major concepts associated with SCM. Topics include logistics, transportation, procurement, demand forecasting, SC operations, information technology, and global SCM.

MARK 40003 Senior Honors Research Paper. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Honors Section of MANA 30153; MARK 30153 with a grade of at least "C," and must be a Business major. Preparation of a research paper in the student's area of concentration in business under the direction of an assigned staff member.

MARK 40113 Marketing Research. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or higher in MARK 30153; DESC 20153, and must be a Business major. Obtaining market information; orientation in use of information gathered; role of management in initiating market studies and in defining problems; types of research; research design; questionnaire construction; sampling; analysis; motivation research; and product research.

MARK 40123 Marketing Planning. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or higher in MARK 30153, MARK 30233, and must be a Business major. An advanced course in the management of the marketing program. Emphasis is placed on marketing planning, implementation and control. Products goods and services, distribution, price and promotion decisions are examined. Decision analysis concepts are applied using examples and application exercises. The course integrates the various activities of an organization that are used to gain competitive advantage by achieving higher levels of customer satisfaction.

MARK 40203 Marketing Strategy. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or higher in MARK 30153 and successful completion of MARK 30233, MARK 40123 or concurrent enrollment in MARK 40123; senior standing, and must be a Business major. Taught primarily through case analysis, the emphasis is on the analysis, planning, implementation and control of marketing systems, policies, programs and actions in domestic and international settings. (May be taken concurrently with Mark 40123.)

MARK 40213 International Marketing. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or higher in MARK 30153; MARK 30233 or concurrent enrollment in Mark 30233, and must be a Business major. This course introduces the field of international marketing and provides a broad perspective from which to explore and examine various aspects of what changes when firms compete internationally. Half the course focuses on unique aspects of the international marketing environment; half concentrates on how the marketing mix is affected by the globalization of markets and competitors.

MARK 40223 Services Marketing. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or higher in MARK 30153; senior standing, and must be a Business major. The primary objective of this course is to prepare students to be successful marketers in an increasingly service-oriented economy. The course is designed to help students understand the unique characteristics of services, the marketing challenges created by these characteristics, and effective ways to address these challenges. Examines marketing strategies unique to public and private, for-profit and not-for-profit services marketing organizations.

MARK 40303 Principles of Retailing. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or higher in MARK 30153, and must be a Business major. Operation of retail stores with particular attention to store location, arrangement, merchandise classification, store organization, personnel, buying, selling, and controlling stock, operating activities, expense control, budgeting, and problems of general policy.

MARK 40323 Procurement/Supply Management. 3 credit hours. Prerequisites: MARK 30153, with a grade of C or better, a must be a Business major. This course focuses on the key issues related to the strategic implications of sourcing of products, the purchasing of goods and services, and the role of purchasing in a supply chain context. It provides students with an understanding of purchasing processes, issues, and best practices. Emphasis areas include supplier quality, relationship management, and global sourcing.

MARK 40333 Supply Chain Analytical Tools and Information Technologies. 3 credit hours. Prerequisites: MARK 30153, and must be a Business major. Effective supply chain management is heavily dependent on state-of-the-art analytical tools and information technologies. This course will provide an understanding of supply chain models and practical tools for effective decision making and integrated supply chain management. The emphasis will be on exploring analytical tools and off-the-shelf information technology packages that have been proven effective in multiple industries, and on identifying and understanding implementation and utilization requirements associated with effective application of such tools.

MARK 40403 Logistics and Transportation. 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MARK 30153, and must be a Business major. Logistics can be defined as "the management of products, services and information flows from the original source of raw materials to the final customer in a manner which produces customer satisfaction and value". This course will cover many aspects of business logistics: supply chain management, demand management, customer service, procurement, inventory management, warehousing, global logistics, transportation and information systems. Logistics and Transportation for many companies have become a source of competitive advantage and this course will explore some of the reasons why.

MARK 40700 Marketing Study Abroad. 3 hours. Prerequisite: MARK 30153 and permission of instructor, and must be a Business major. An intensive, on-site study of marketing practices abroad. Sites include Europe and Mexico. This course may be repeated for credit.

MARK 40970 Special Problems in Marketing. 1-3 hours. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or higher in MARK 30153; overall and major GPA of 2.5 or higher; permission of instructor and chairperson, and must be a Business major. This course may be repeated for credit.

Texas Christian University