Introduction Organization
Degree Programs
The Bachelor of Arts Degree
The Bachelor of Science Degree
Multiple Majors
Transfer Credit
Pass/No Credit Option

 Overview

The College of Science and Engineering was formed in 2000 when AddRan College of Arts and Sciences was reorganized into the College of Science and Engineering and AddRan College of Humanities and Social Sciences. Composed of the departments of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Engineering, Geology, Mathematics, Nutritional Sciences, Physics and Astronomy, and Psychology, the goals of the college are to support the mission of the University; to integrate the research and undergraduate teaching missions; to prepare majors for careers and further study in science, mathematics, and engineering; to assist in the preparation of highly qualified K-12 mathematics and science teachers; and to provide experiences for all TCU students that will facilitate their becoming and continuing to be scientifically and mathematically literate citizens.

The college offers Bachelor of Science degrees with majors in 19 fields of study and Bachelor of Arts degrees with majors in 6 fields. The college also administers the Bachelor of General Studies degree. In conjunction with the Program in Ranch Management, a program leading to the B.S. degree with a major in Ranch Management is available through the College of Science and Engineering. Students in the degree program are advised by a designated representative of the dean of the college and should consult with the advisor early in their degree program. Minors are available in 14 fields.

The college is responsible for the Pre-Health Professions programs (pre-dentistry, pre-medicine, pre-veterinary medicine). The college also works in conjunction with the School of Education to offer a 3-2 program leading to a Master of Education degree and with the School of Business to offer a 3-2 program leading to a Master of Business Administration.

Sid W. Richardson houses departmental offices of Chemistry, Geology, and Physics and Astronomy. Biology and Psychology are in Winton-Scott Hall. Nutritional Sciences are in the Annie Richardson Bass Building. College administrative offices and departmental offices for Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics are located in the Tucker Technology Building.

Organization

The College of Science and Engineering is organized into 9 departments.

Departments:
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Engineering
Geology
Mathematics
Nutritional Sciences
Physics and Astronomy
Psychology

Interdepartmental programs:
Environmental Earth Resources (Geology)
Environmental Science (Biology and Geology)
Neuroscience (Psychology)
Pre-Health Professions
Ranch Management

Cooperative programs:

Master of Education (3-2 program with School of Education)
Master of Business Administration (3-2 program with M.J. Neeley School of Business)

Degree Programs

The College of Science and Engineering administers programs which lead to the following baccalaureate degrees:

The Bachelor of Arts degree with majors in the following fields:

Biology
Chemistry
Geology
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology

The Bachelor of Science degree with majors in the following fields:

Astronomy and Physics
Biochemistry (Chemistry)
Biology
Chemistry
Combined Science (Pre-Health Professions)
Computer Information Technology (Computer Science)
Computer Science
Dietetics (Nutritional Sciences)
Engineering
Environmental Science (Biology and Geology)
Environmental Earth Resources (Geology)
Food Management (Nutritional Sciences)
Geology
Mathematics
Neuroscience (Psychology)
Nutrition (Nutritional Sciences)
Physics
Psychology
Ranch Management

The Bachelor of General Studies degree

Minors

Astronomy
Biology
Chemistry
Combined Science
Computer Information Technology
Computer Science
Environmental Science
Geology
Health Care Ethics
Mathematics
Nutrition
Physics
Psychology
Ranch Management

Minors for students majoring in the College of Science and Engineering are also accepted from AddRan College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the College of Fine Arts, the College of Communication, School of Education, the School of Business (General Business), and the College of Health and Human Sciences.

The Bachelor of Arts Degree

Students pursuing a program leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete a minimum of 124 semester hours, 42 of which must be advanced (30000 level or above) from TCU, with a major and a minor selected from the approved list of majors and minors. The specific number of hours required for the major and minor may be found in the appropriate section of this Bulletin.

In addition, students must complete the following UCR for the Bachelor of Arts degree:

I. Foundations: 9 credit hours

The Foundations requirements, which include courses to refine and enhance skills in critical reading, written composition, and mathematics, allow students beginning the undergraduate curriculum to increase their proficiency in these essential skills.

A. The Writing Requirement-6 credit hours, and the Writing Emphasis Experience.

1. Writing Workshop-6 credit hours

This requirement is to be met by courses designated "Writing Workshop," with no more than 3 of these hours in freshman-level study. Writing Workshop courses assume the student's successful completion of four units of high school English.

This requirement is to be met by at least one course in various modes of composition, including analytical writing and research techniques and writing. Both writing courses are to include a reading component providing composition models of suitable kinds. Student writing in these courses is expected to increase competence in grammar, mechanics, and other conventions customary in written discourse.

AP or CLEP credit may satisfy up to 6 hours of the writing requirement.

2. Writing Emphasis Experience

To allow juniors and seniors to increase their writing skills, the University Curriculum includes a writing emphasis component.

This requirement, which ordinarily should not increase the credit hours required by the University Curriculum, is to be satisfied by two upper-division courses (3 credit hours for each) with a "writing emphasis" designation. Because any academic unit of the University may offer courses with a writing emphasis, courses satisfying other baccalaureate degree requirements may also meet the writing emphasis requirement of the University Curriculum. Writing should occur throughout the course and total a minimum of 2,500 words.

B. Mathematics-3 credit hours

This requirement is to be satisfied by Department of Mathematics courses at or above the freshman level. Appropriate courses assume the student's successful completion of 3 units of high school mathematics: two in algebra and one in geometry.

AP or CLEP credit may satisfy this requirement.


II. Explorations: 42 credit hours


The Explorations requirements assure that all baccalaureate candidates encounter certain broad areas of knowledge. Through this experience, the student will gain knowledge and perspectives by studying various domains of human knowledge and experience.

The Explorations requirements allow no more than 6 credit hours from courses in a single department or in that department's cross-listed courses. This limitation applies regardless of the UCR groups in which the department's course offerings appear. Approved integrative courses are excluded from this restriction.

Satisfactory fulfillment of the Explorations section requires completion of 42 credit hours. The College of Science and Engineering students are required to choose a course that exposes them to a non-U.S. cultural perspective as they fulfill the requirements of this section.

A. Physical and Life Sciences-9 credit hours (NOTE: Courses in mathematics, computer science, and engineering do not satisfy this requirement.)

Six (6) credit hours must be in laboratory courses such as those offered in biology, chemistry, geology, physics, and psychology.

The purpose of the requirement is to include study in scientific disciplines in which observation, deduction, and analytical reasoning are essential methods. The requirement also ensures that students gain an understanding of scientific discoveries achieved by such methods.

Courses meeting this requirement involve observing experimental parameters, recording and interpreting such observations, and drawing conclusions based on appropriate theoretical frameworks. The experimental dimension is to include appropriate mathematical concepts and applications. Students are also required to demonstrate their ability to present such material in a narrative form.

B. Social Sciences-9 credit hours

The requirement is to be satisfied by courses using the methods of the social sciences. The courses customarily will include study of institutions as they affect individuals and groups. The approach to such study is through disciplines such as economics, political science, and sociology.

C. Cultural Heritage-15 credit hours

Students must choose at least one course from each sub-section of Section C.

1. Religion-minimum of 3 credit hours

Courses satisfying this requirement examine the role of religion in human culture, with this examination directed to a single religion or to a comparative consideration of major religions. These courses include appropriate historical study as well as texts important to the religions.

2. Historical Studies-minimum of 3 credit hours

The minimum is to be met by a 3-credit-hour course in U.S. historical studies. Courses meeting this requirement make evident the methods of history. Such courses may be general in their subject matter or specific or topical in focus, but are to encourage the development of a critical and evaluative attitude toward historical texts and sources.

3. Critical Inquiry-minimum of 3 credit hours

Courses satisfying this requirement are primarily critical/evaluative in approach. This approach can be applied to modes of inquiry, to methods in various disciplines, or to public issues and contemporary views. These courses make evident the individual's responsibility for making informed decisions.

4. Fine Arts-minimum of 3 credit hours

The requirement is to be met by critical and/or historical courses studying one or more of the fine arts (e.g., theater, music, visual arts). Performance courses do not satisfy this requirement.

D. Language and Literature-9 hours

1. Foreign Language-6 hours in the same language at the 20000 level or above satisfy this requirement.

2. Oral Communication or Literature-3 hours

a. Oral Communication

This requirement is satisfied by courses directed to developing skills in oral communication; to training in clear, logical, and persuasive communication appropriate in various contexts; and to evaluating such communication.

b. Literature

Courses satisfying this requirement enable students to learn to analyze and criticize literary texts. These courses are to include appropriate historical, biographical, and ideological materials, and to be developed around a single writer or group of writers, a period, a literary form or genre, and/or critical theories by which the same works are examined by various means.



III. Physical Education: two credit hours


The Physical Education policies and exceptions listed in Requirements for Graduation in The Bachelor's Degree section of this bulletin also apply to the Bachelor of Arts degree.

NOTES:

1. 6 hours of UCR credits in a given department may be applied to other baccalaureate requirements in that department such as those for major, minor, etc.

2. Students transferring to TCU must complete a minimum of 6 hours in Writing Emphasis and 3 hours in Critical Inquiry courses at TCU.

3. No more than eight (8) semester hours of Physical Education activity courses may be applied toward graduation requirements.

4. Specific courses have been approved to meet the UCR. These courses are so identified in the printed schedule of classes for each term's offerings.

5. Foreign Language Requirements: Students who are not native speakers of English may satisfy the foreign language requirement for the B.A. degree by submitting to the English Language Center coordinator a score of at least 600 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and at least 5.0 on the Test of Written English (TWE). An oral interview may also be required. No academic credit is granted on this basis, but the requirement to take 6 hours of foreign language at the 20000 level may be waived.

The Bachelor of Science Degree

Students pursuing a program leading to a Bachelor of Science degree must complete the minimum number of semester hours (typically 124 or 132), 42 of which must be advanced (30000 level or above) from TCU, specified for their particular major. Specific requirements of each major are to be found in the appropriate section of this bulletin. Where a minor is called for, it is to be selected with the assistance of the student's adviser from the list of approved minors.

In addition to the specific requirements, students must complete the following UCR for the Bachelor of Science degree:


I. Foundations: 9 credit hours


The Foundations requirements, which include courses to refine and enhance skills in critical reading, written composition, and mathematics, allow students beginning the undergraduate curriculum to increase their proficiency in these essential skills.

A. The Writing Requirement-6 credit hours, and the Writing Emphasis Experience.

1. Writing Workshop-6 credit hours

This requirement is to be met by courses designated "writing workshop," with no more than 3 of these hours in freshman-level study. Writing workshop courses assume the student's successful completion of 4 units of high school English.

This requirement is to be met by at least one course in various modes of composition, including analytical writing and research techniques and writing. Both writing courses are to include a reading component providing composition models of suitable kinds. Student writing in these courses is expected to increase competence in grammar, mechanics, and other conventions customary in written discourse.

AP or CLEP credit may satisfy up to 6 hours of the writing requirement.

2. Writing Emphasis Experience

To allow juniors and seniors to increase their writing skills, the University Curriculum includes a writing emphasis component.

This requirement, which ordinarily should not increase the credit hours required by the University Curriculum, is to be satisfied by two upper-division courses (3 credit hours for each) with a "writing emphasis" designation. Because any academic unit of the University may offer courses with a writing emphasis, courses satisfying other baccalaureate degree requirements may also meet the writing emphasis requirement of the University Curriculum.

B. Mathematics-3 credit hours

This requirement is to be satisfied by Department of Mathematics courses at or above the freshman level. Appropriate courses assume the student's successful completion of 3 units of high school mathematics: two in algebra and one in geometry.

AP or CLEP credit may satisfy this requirement.


II. Explorations: 42 credit hours


The Explorations requirements assure that all baccalaureate candidates encounter certain broad areas of knowledge. Through this experience, the student will gain knowledge and perspectives by studying various domains of human knowledge and experience.

The Explorations requirements allow no more than 6 credit hours from courses in a single department or in that department's cross-listed courses. This limitation applies regardless of the UCR groups in which the department's course offerings appear. Approved integrative courses are excluded from this restriction.

The College of Science and Engineering students are required to choose a course that exposes them to a non-U.S. cultural perspective as they fulfill the requirements of this section.

A. Physical and Life Sciences-9 credit hours (Courses in mathematics, computer science and engineering do not satisfy this requirement).

Six (6) credit hours must be in laboratory courses such as those offered in biology, chemistry, geology, physics, and psychology.

The purpose of the requirement is to include study in scientific disciplines in which observation, deduction, and analytical reasoning are essential methods. The requirement also ensures that students gain an understanding of scientific discoveries achieved by such methods.

Courses meeting this requirement involve observing experimental parameters, recording and interpreting such observations, and drawing conclusions based on appropriate theoretical frameworks. The experimental dimension is to include appropriate mathematical concepts and applications. Students are also required to demonstrate their ability to present such material in a narrative form.

B. Social Sciences-9 credit hours

The requirement is to be satisfied by courses using the methods of the social sciences. The courses customarily will include study of institutions as they affect individuals and groups. The approach to such study is through disciplines such as economics, political science, and sociology.

C. Cultural Heritage-15 credit hours

Students must choose at least one course from each subsection of Section C.

1. Religion-minimum of 3 credit hours

Courses satisfying this requirement examine the role of religion in human culture, with this examination directed to a single religion or to a comparative consideration of major religions. These courses include appropriate historical study as well as texts important to the religions.

2. Historical Studies-minimum of 3 credit hours

The minimum is to be met by a 3-credit-hour course in U.S. historical studies.

Courses meeting this requirement make evident the methods of history. Such courses may be general in their subject matter or specific or topical in focus, but are to encourage the development of a critical and evaluative attitude toward historical texts and sources.

3. Critical Inquiry-minimum of 3 credit hours

Courses satisfying this requirement are primarily critical/evaluative in approach. This approach can be applied to modes of inquiry, to methods in various disciplines, or to public issues and contemporary views. These courses make evident the individual's responsibility for making informed decisions.

4. Fine Arts-minimum of 3 credit hours

The requirement is to be met by critical and/or historical courses studying one or more of the fine arts (e.g., theater, music, visual arts). Performance courses do not satisfy this requirement.

D. Languages and Literature-9 credit hours

If any foreign language credit is used toward this requirement, 6 hours must be taken in the same language.

1. Foreign Language-Foreign language courses at or above the freshman level satisfy this requirement. AP or CLEP credit may also be applied.

2. Oral Communication or Literature-If foreign language credit is used, the remaining 3 credit hours are to be selected from oral communication or literature; otherwise, the 9 hours are to come from oral communication and literature courses.

a. Oral Communication - This requirement is satisfied by courses directed to developing skills in oral communication; to training in clear, logical, and persuasive communication appropriate in various contexts; and to evaluating such communication.

b. Literature - Courses satisfying this requirement enable students to learn to analyze and criticize literary texts. These courses are to include appropriate historical, biographical, and ideological materials, and to be developed around a single writer or group of writers, a period, a literary form or genre, and/or critical theories by which the same works are examined by various means.

III. Physical Education: 2 credit hours

The Physical Education policies and exceptions listed in Requirements for Graduation in The Bachelor's Degree section of this bulletin also apply to the Bachelor of Science degree.

NOTES:

1. Six (6) hours of UCR credits in a given department may be applied to other baccalaureate requirements in that department such as those for major, minor, teaching specialty, etc.

2. Students transferring to TCU must complete a minimum of 6 hours in Writing Emphasis courses at TCU.

3. No more than eight (8) physical activities courses may be applied toward graduation requirements.

4. Specific courses have been approved to meet the UCR. These courses are so identified in the printed schedule of classes for each term's offerings.

5. Foreign Language Requirements: Students who are not native speakers of English may satisfy the foreign language requirement for the B.S. degree by submitting to the English Language Center coordinator a score of at least 600 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and at least 5.0 on the Test of Written English (TWE). An oral interview may also be required.

Multiple Majors

Students with a first major in Science and Engineering may declare an additional major in lieu of or in addition to a minor on either a B.A. or B.S. degree. The additional major may be selected from the list of Science and Engineering approved majors or may be selected from majors available in other TCU schools and colleges. Students seeking an additional major in a school or college other than Science and Engineering must have the approval of the dean of Science and Engineering and the dean of the additional major.

Students with a first major in another TCU school or college may select additional majors from those available in Science and Engineering with the approval of the dean of the first major and the dean of Science and Engineering. Students whose first major is in a TCU school or college other than Science and Engineering and who seek a second major from Science and Engineering need only satisfy the UCR requirements of the first major with one exception. If the student is meeting requirements of a Science and Engineering B.A. degree, the language requirement of 6 hours in the same foreign language at or above the 20000 level must be satisfied.

The degree awarded will be that appropriate to the major designated as the first major. All degree requirements for each major must be satisfied. These include all University Curriculum Requirements (UCR) associated with any particular major as well as all associated requirements.

Transfer Credit

Students wishing to take courses at another college or university following their admission to Texas Christian University must receive approval of such courses through the office of the Dean of College of Science and Engineering before enrolling in them.

Pass/No Credit Option

The department of the major controls acceptability of P/NC for studies in both the major and minor, if any. For a specific major, consult the appropriate section of the Science and Engineering section of this Bulletin. The P/NC option is not allowed in any English as a Foreign Language course offered by the English Language Center.

Texas Christian University